8

Pruning the branch back hard/heavily is about the only thing that will keep the crotch from splitting, aside from guy wiring it to other parts of the tree. For all practical intents, that joint will never get stronger. However, there is no reason to wait until next season. You can remove the branch anytime during the growing season (trees naturally ...


3

Capnodis sexmaculata (Coleoptera; Buprestidae). In Balochistan, Pakistan it is a pest of Apricot and Almond


3

What you have is a fungal disease known as Coryneum blight. From here: Coryneum blight, also known as shothole blight, is a fungal disease that can cause damage on peach, nectarine, apricot, almonds (ornamental as well as nut bearing) and, to a lesser degree, cherries (tart and sweet). Coryneus blight is caused by the fungal pathogen Wilsonomyces ...


2

I haven't got good news either I'm afraid. The absence of soft, soggy, oozing or rotting areas rules out bacterial canker, but you might be looking at a case of Silver Leaf fungal infection or Phytoplasmas infection, which has been a problem in your area for some years. Silver leaf can be caused by pruning cuts made at the wrong time of year - stone fruit ...


2

You should probably prepare for bad news. The tree shows signs of bacterial canker infection which is reinforced by your description of the onset of the problem. The infection enters through cuts, blossoms and tools used to prune. It is made more likely in areas with a cold climate not tempered by the proximity of large bodies of water. It can affect ...


2

Our apricot tree sounds as though the environment could be a residential setting and The tree bears flowers and then fruits sounds as though this might be an annual occurrence. Hence an alternative to lack of water, from Kristi Waterworth may be of interest: Why Apricot Fruits Fall from Tree Apricot fruit falling off your tree happens because most ...


2

Looks like too much sun - some damaged tissue but it shouldn't be fatal. Usually you need to harden plants off when moving them to different lighting (especially newly germinated plants). Also, the seedlings will outgrow those pots in no time. Be ready with bigger pots (or a spot in the ground if the weather's right). On another note, watch that the soil ...


2

That branch likely is infected with a fungus, many of which are called cankers. Fungi like verticillium that is renowned for afflicting Japanese maples gets into the xylem (wood) and clogs the lumens. This means the leafs cannot get enough water to replenish what is lost by normal transpiration, so they loose turgidity or wilt. Shortly thereafter they will ...


2

If we go by pictures 3 and 4 numbered from the top, we see an example shoot. What we expect to see in a healthy tree is a number of growth segments (in the pictures we can see about 4 of these with different colour bark on the twig). Each segment represents a year of growth, and each should be about the same length which in a vigorous tree could be 10 cm and ...


1

Depends how many fruitlets are falling - if its a percentage, this might just be what's known as 'June Drop'. Many fruit trees do this - it refers to the tree deciding for itself that it's carrying too many fruits, so it drops some and keeps the rest so that they mature and swell properly, because from the tree's point of view, its fruits are only seedcases, ...


1

On short term, you should choose which variety you want to keep. Forget to have 4 varieties: they will fight to have food from root. Only one will survive. [Such plants are scams from cheap gardening centers]. Now you should prune continuously, to have all branches with the same strength. The top branches will get naturally more, so you should prune some ...


1

As user22542 stated in the comments on the question: If the tree was from a nursery, it was a grafted tree grafted onto root stock. The "root stock" is typically about 4-6 inches above the ground where the graft is placed. If the tree was cut lower than four inches or so, your sprout is most likely coming from the root stock and probably won't grow into a ...


1

Black Cherry (Prunus serotina) is the best one where I am, because it's relatively fast growing (splittable wood every 12/18 years in decent conditions, and can be coppiced. The favorable smoke fragrance is very good with this species. It is hardy in zone 5.


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