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10

I can't be certain with the picture quality but based on their location in the wood chips and their appearance I'm going to say you have termites. Certainly get rid of them and/or call a bug inspector to verify.


10

You might have a case of ants farming the aphids. If this is the case, tackling the aphids will not likely be productive as the ants will just replace the aphids. I suspect you will need to attack the ant nest directly. The suggestion I thought would work best from the above link was pouring boiling chili water down the nest.


8

A teaspoon of dish soap mixed with a quart of water and sprayed on will knock down the population of aphids and kill some ants. Leave it on a minute or two and give the plant a good wash down afterwards with water. (This is in case it is a plant with delicate leaves like lettuce or the mixture has too much soap and the fatty acids burn the leaves.)


7

Ants are in no way harmful to your vegetable plants. With at least one caveat. They love to raise and promote aphids. So cute, really. Lettuce is easy 'food' for aphids but rarely will you see aphids on lettuce unless there is nothing else available and/or they've been PUT there by ants! Look for tear drop shaped crawling insects. They can be bright ...


6

I'd never use Orthene (or any organophosphate insecticide) where children play. But I've never had to deal with anything as nasty as fire ants, either. Here are some thoughts, based on reading. See especially the links at the bottom of the page. It sounds like you didn't get down to the queen with orthene, which suggests that a different treatment mode ...


6

Ants aren't typically trouble for plants themselves. They do like sweet things, of course, and would be attracted to the fruit but I've not seen them destroy plants themselves. Could be aphids. The honeydew produced by the aphids is something the ants like. Ants have this interesting relationship with aphids. The aphids produce the honeydew and the ants ...


6

Aphids inhabit leaves and shoots, particularly new shoots - ants 'farm' them to collect their honeydew, so it might be that the tiny black flies are actually aphids. I've magnified the pictures, but can't see clearly what the little black thing is, but they are most likely aphids - they tend not to move because they're sucking sap from your plant. Seems odd ...


6

It appears to be scale insects. I'm not experienced with scales, but I imagine you can use neem oil and/or diatomaceous earth once in a while to help. I would get the diatomaceous earth all over the stems, wherever they are. I hear you can put a circle of cinnamon or something around your pot to help deter ants.


6

Some varieties of paeony do attract ants, on the flower buds particularly. The buds excrete a type of sap that the ants find attractive and which they consume - once the flowers open, the ants disappear. It was once thought that the ants' activities on the buds were essential to their being able to open, but that myth has been debunked, they open with or ...


5

In addition to Stormy's answer, the other possibility is that the ants are looking for water. Lettuce and chard leaves often trap drops of water even in hot weather, and as a result are used as a source of water by ants, bees, and other insects.


5

Some ant here and there might eat a dead aphid or two, but they seem to actually have a symbiotic relationship, more or less, with the ants using the aphids for sugar, which they actually make, believe it or not, and then in turn protecting the aphids. So, no, neither is helping you. Washing the plant off with a very diluted soap and water solution will ...


5

Yeah, carpenter ant damage and apparent heart rot. You aren't going to be able to do anything at this point. Definitely do not fill it, as that will seal in moisture. I'd recommend replacing the tree. If it has strong sentimental value, perhaps you can leave it, and just fight individual symptoms as they go along, but this tree is past it's prime. And ...


5

Use neem oil or soapy water/insecticidal soap for the aphids. Most species of ants are slightly beneficial, except when they are running a protection racket on some aphids.


4

Ortho Fire Ant killer is the poison orthene, which is widely used on crops. So it shouldn't harm a tree. I have had great success controlling fire ants by spreading bait like Amdro over a wide area, including my neighbor's yards. It isn't fast, though. The Ortho is an immediate killer at a particular mound. Use Ortho on mounds that you can see and Amdro ...


4

Ants do spread aphids around. Small black ants was seen around/in my pots starting spring. By July potted plants, even geranium, was affected - ants brought aphids, mildew spots appeared, plants was stressed and not healthy. Ants was noticed during watering - they was running from under the pots, closer look revealed ants in almost every pot. Insect killers ...


4

How close is this tree to your home? Is this tree old or not doing well? I would NOT DIY for this. You should have a professional come out and go through your home. They know how to look for termites. So much damage can happen to structures before one notices that all structures should be visually examined more often. This is a good excuse to check your ...


4

It is a symbiotic relationship. The peony produces nectar from unopened buds that ants love to eat, much like Bamboo says. There are a few species of plants that produce nectar outside of their flowers to tempt ants to live nearby. In many of those species ants will feed on the nectar and while they are at it they will attack any other animals that might ...


4

Well yes, they excrete like all animals, and yes this would contain nutrients. You are unlikely to see that though as they are quite fastidious creatures and like to do their own composting. You may sometimes see granular material that they have deposited around the entrances to their nest, but this is just material that they have excavated. In an open ...


3

Dish soap will kill ants but it will not kill the queen in the nest or remove the cause that is bringing the ants to the plants. Normally ants will only go great distances for food. They have everything else they need at their home! It is likely that you have scale or mealybug on some of your house plants that are excreting a sugary sap. This will attract ...


3

Yes, it will kill grass if you use it neat. You can try a 3% solution of dish soap mixed with water and sprayed on the area, that might kill the ants but shouldn't harm the grass. There are other suggestions in this link https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/plant-problems/pests/insects/how-to-control-ants-in-lawns.htm


3

Not too much of a problem in open ground, but they certainly can be if they're nesting in your containers or pots. They don't eat plant roots, but they can and do break them up in order to extend their nest within the container. If they're already in there, you need to take remedial action, the first part of which is to thoroughly soak the pots to encourage ...


3

Most species of ants generally don't cause a problem in gardens. They do tunnel, and if too excessively there can be trouble, and they can farm aphids on your plants, and protect them from possible predators. But on your plants, I don't see that they're an issue. They will clean up fallen fruit, if any, eat some bugs (mostly the herbivorous bugs), and ...


3

Since you mention Spring beginning, you must be in the southern hemisphere, which means I know less about the kinds of ants you get there. Ants in general though do not all eat plants, though its true to say ants eat almost anything - their preference is for sweet stuff, and where you are, you may have ants that do like certain plants. Usually, they are ...


3

Your carrots do have a severe aphid infestation. Often you can blast them off with a strong jet of water, but the ants will lift them back up again if they're harvesting the aphid dew. So, you're left with any of the insecticidal mixes that deal with aphids including insecticidal soaps, neem oil etc, as well as biocontrol with parasitic wasps and ladybugs. ...


2

Whoa! You guys obviously haven't watched 'Ants'...that animated movie with Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Stallone...grin! I've never had problems with ants. This new garden I've got is riddled with ants, all types of ants. I know they domesticate aphids (isn't that cool?) but whenever I see aphids a spray of soap or neem takes care of them. It takes ...


2

Ants as a unified body of individuals are brilliant. Us humans could and should learn a thing or two from these insects. Ants eat a huge diversity of foods to include fats, cheese, breads, grease, other insects. Eating decomposing dying organic material is easier and less costly energy wise than eating live vigorous plant material. Ants are amazing. ...


2

You should be able to tell if there's a nest in one or more of the pots - when there is, there's always black flecks of soil around the base of the pot. But if your plants otherwise look healthy,it seems unlikely there's a large ants' nest in any of them. You can check by raising the pots off the ground slightly, on pot feet or anything you've got that will ...


2

Dilution will help. Water the patch thoroughly and allow it to spread the acetic acid about a bit, both sideways and down. Yes, the strong acid will have burned some roots; this will result in some leaf death which is kind of inevitable. But then the watering will carry the acid down below the grass root zone which will be in the top few inches. Then the ...


2

I noticed when adding a vinegar solution to some weeds experimentally, only the leaves in the sun were damaged by it. If it's not too late, you can try shading the spots of grass for a while, and diluting it with water as Colin said. I can't say what effect the vinegar would have on the roots, per se. Vinegar isn't supposed to make soil more acidic in the ...


1

MiniMe...ants are not a problem ever for plants. Well, they do the aphid harvesting gig but even then no problems really. Was the bottom of this trunk buried for awhile? How does the rest of your tree look? I'd get rid of the straw for sure. Don't worry about the ants. Coral bark Japanese Maples are breath taking. As long as your tree is healthy I don'...


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