Hot answers tagged

17

These look like the tree lichens that are growing on my own trees. A lichen is a composite organism where by a fungus lives together with an algae in a symbiotic relationship. They don't hurt the tree, and are more commonly seen on the bark of older trees where the bark is not constantly being shed and regrown. So, it may also be an indicator of poor health ...


10

These are mycelium, and perfectly normal in "live" compost. The top was exposed to air, so it dried out. The white may be a fungus growing on the surface. Slugs like damp places, especially where there's stuff they can eat. It does not seem "strange" to me that you'd find one in a bag of "naturally moist" compost (i.e. slug food) that has been left to sit ...


9

As Graham says they are lichen and moss. A tree will commonly live in a symbiotic relationship with millions of macro and micro-scopic organisms. In tropical and temperate rain forests overgrowth on the the bark is very common. I cannot find any research which indicates that they harm the tree in any way at any age as these publications indicate. That ...


6

Your problem is thinking this is a plant. This is obviously a mushroom. If you look for "black mushroom growing in bathroom" you'll find relevant results. One of the genera is called coprinus but I'm not enough of a mycologist to tell if you have that or something else.


5

Unfortunately, its the light that causes the algal growth. Now you've turned it, the other side will produce algae in response to the light - the brighter the light, the stronger the algal growth, just like an aquarium or fish tank, and it may eventually turn black. One of the disadvantages of planting in clear containers I'm afraid. I agree it shouldn't ...


4

The algae shouldn't hurt the plant, but if you are seeing a lot of it, you could be over-watering, which can hurt a plant... people will say that the algae will compete for nutrients, which might be true, but it isn't on a scale that you would expect to be able to observe.


4

Not really, if water is pooling in the area, or it remains damp and sunless, particularly in our wet winters. On roof slates or walls, the addition of a copper strip at the top, so that any water running down contains a minute amount of copper, inhibits algal growth or stops it altogether, but that's not going to be effective in the area you describe. I'm ...


2

Two things...too much water and too cold. Lucky Bamboo likes the temp to stay above 65F. Algae does not use the same nutrients as more complex plants do and not at the same proportions, algae will eat a lot more phosporous and nitrogen than anything else, but will generally not use other nutrients. I know most fertilize is NPK based, but that's totally and ...


1

Use of UV for sterilizing water vinegar for killing algae I am familiar with these UV bulbs and systems for ponds, aquariums and hot tubs. You've got a good idea! But I couldn't find anything about killing algae on surfaces without water. If you find anyone who tells you that your idea is possible, would you please let us know? If I were you, I would ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible