9

With only a 1/3 of an acre of land I personally would aerate it myself, many rental shops allow you to rent a machine for a day for less than $100. Stay away from the "aeration shoes" though as they only poke a hole into the ground and then compact the soil more. The trick is to remove a plug of sod so that air and water can penetrate. The machine you are ...


9

I always dethatch first. That will create a clearer path for the other equipment, and make it a lot easier for the slicer overseeder. As for the other two, I like to run the aerator first, to avoid disturbing newly sown seed. It can be done either way, and both ways I've noticed seed falling into the aerator holes, where it will not germinate. That doesn't ...


7

First, that looks cheap, to me. I would expect at that price to be getting a half-job, not a high quality one. I think doing it yourself is far better. As Phlume says (rightly), The machine you linked to is a tiller. it will kill the grass that is already there. I use a Plugr Aerator, which will cost over $4500 new. I'd recommend renting. As for whether ...


7

No, don't bother, it absolutely is not necessary and not a good idea either. Just use the pots as they are - the fact that a little free water is sitting in the bottom of the empty pot in your image isn't an issue. People have been growing plants in plastic pots for decades (including me) without creating 'aeration' holes in the sides, and the plants are ...


5

So, the color of soil comes from what is in it or what is NOT in it (as you indicated in your question), its drainage, as well as lawn or land physical Geo (hill slopes, flat, rocky mountainous, etc, and the age of it's contents. Lighter colored soils tend to have less active organic material and more sand or rock. Soil light or very light in color means it ...


5

Not only is it as good as an actual lawn aerating machine, its better - but it's time consuming and there's a knack to it. You need to insert the fork vertically and remove it in the same direction without tipping it either back or forward. Once you've inserted it, stand on it to make sure the tines go down to a good four inches, then pull it out. A little ...


5

Leave the cores on the grass! Water deeply only when you are able to see your footprints left on your lawn/grass. Great indicator. Use a spade to see how deep the water reached into the soil profile after 15 minutes. It should be a minimum of 4". 6" is better depending on the porosity of the soil. Allow the lawn to dry out and don't water again until ...


5

As stated above, any lawn renovation should start with a comprehensive soil test (available here) for $30 or so. For that money they'll even tell you how much of what soil ammendments you deed to apply. But IF you are going in blind, it seems almost a wast to aerate and stop at that. When we do lawn rejuvenations, we start with good core aeration (covering ...


4

For once I have to disagree with Bamboo! Poking tines in the ground actually compresses soil further. Proper aeration is only done by REMOVING cores of soil and allowing these cores to disintegrate on top of the lawn. Very inexpensive to go rent one of these machines and usually works out well if you talk to your neighbors and share the machine. All ...


3

Sepiolite is a clay that's non-toxic (it's used in animal feed) but unlike vermiculite and perlite actually hurts, rather than helps, drainage. According to this source, it can absorb its weight in water. Unlike a hydrogel, it does not release the water back to the roots. This will leave your soil waterlogged, which will kill most houseplants. Interestingly, ...


3

Dark soil versus light soil means lots of different things. First would be moisture content. Second organic material content. Third possibly a layer of non indigenous soil that was installed earlier. Those are the top three I can think of... You've probably got dry areas of grass where the grass is weakened and of course weeds will move in...I just have ...


3

Purists I once knew would rake up all the cores and then fill the holes with sand; but that was starting with a pristine lawn. I wouldn't even bother to spend the time and money aerating a grungy lawn until you get the grass to grow. I just bought a pull behind aerator for my new lawn tractor; both of which I had owned before at a previous house. I always ...


3

Carbon dioxide easily dissolves in water, creating carbonic acid: H2O + CO2 <===> H2CO3. This will soon reverse the effect of aeration, relowering the pH. So it's best to wait until the water pH is stabilized in the particular environment. After the mixture is ready, test the pH and let it sit for ten minutes. If it stays the same, there is no necessary ...


3

According to GoodNature website: What is Core Aeration? Grass roots need oxygen to function and in our heavy clay soils here in Ohio, getting enough oxygen to the roots can sometimes be difficult. With core aeration, we poke holes into your soil and pull the cores out. Aeration helps lawns with thatch problems. It loosens the soil to let ...


3

Yep, been there, done that, never forgotten it - first I twisted my ankle, then I fell over two or three times, and once I'd got to grips with how to move with them on, calf and knee and hip pain for a week, not to mention causing great hilarity at the doctor's surgery when I went for more pain relief. The neighbours were vastly entertained too... Seriously,...


3

Fall is the best time to aerate. I wouldn't do it when temperatures at night are regularly at or below freezing but your temperatures look balmy, now. I am assuming you have cool season grasses since you are looking forward to a winter and freezing, so go ahead and aerate. Leave those plugs right where they fall. They will disintegrate adding soil and ...


2

I'm going to go with "it depends.". If you are trying to grow cactus in England, perhaps holes would help. If you are growing a tropical plant in Arizona, probably not useful. I have used both terra cotta and plastic pots for cactus in Arizona and I add holes to the bottom of both types. So, it really depends on what you are growing, what potting media ...


2

Your compost pile doesn't have the right carbon to nitrogen ratio to get hot if it is just leaves and needles. Just let that pile sit and cold compost for a good year or two. It will work. Besides that though, you can aerate the pile well enough with the perforated pipe coming from the center out of the pile and no fan. I have done that before with ...


2

Truly not a bad program. BUT. It is a waste of time to core aerate until you've got a mature crop of grass. So cross that one off. The other thing that pops out is the excavation of the soil. The very top 4" is the soil you want to use. The subsoil is (NW) almost pure clay and to mix that up into your top soil would be asking for tons more work. I'd ...


2

A cheap ingredient that is available at feed stores is chicken grit. What is available near you may vary but common sources are granite, calcium, flint or oyster shell. It is sold as tiny sharp edged fragments. It goes well with peat based soil mixes that are often acidic as the calcium or oyster based mixes are usually alkaline. It does not degrade and ...


2

It depends on what plants you have .For my orchids, which need good=fast drainage and air circulation , I use small gravel, porous rock ( lava stone ,very similar to tufa but cheaper ) , chunks of bark, charcoal and maybe a pinch of potting soil . For bromeliads and cactus , I use mostly sand and enough rock and gravel to physically support them. For large ...


2

I strongly recommend aerating before planting. The looser and less compact your soil is the better chance the seeds you sow will have to germinate. I would also recommend dethatching if there is any evidence of thatch in your lawn. Again, this will I have a complete section on aerating and dethatching on my website, Aerating and Dethatching.


2

Your lawn in the first photo showed poor drainage, intermittent maintenance. You need to improve the drainage. Your poor fence! It is soaked at the bottom, and of course rotting away. 2" below that fence board is your lowest elevation near the fences and sheds. You are working way too hard. I would get a sod cutter and remove that lawn. Use that sod ...


1

Typical ingredients depend on the plant and soil needs. Little water holding requries good drainage. That's done with Sands or lava rocks, perlite.


1

Thank you @stormy for your help. These two photos are the most recent photos. I seeded two weeks ago. Thank you again


1

Your yard looks way better from previous photos! Dang, I have to ask this question; are you set on trying to grow grasses in this very shady area? If you are try to make sure you have shade grass seed, do not aerate until next year, best to have your grass sprayed in by a grass seeding company. They include just the right amount of fertilizer and that ...


1

I would core aerate now and allow the plugs to disintegrate. September I would mow my lawn down short so the grass won't be shading the seed. Short as in 2". Top dress with 1/2" of topsoil, not compost. There are topsoils with compost added. But a word of warning; you have no idea what is in that compost. I've run into topsoil with added compost where I ...


1

Well, I kinda hate to ruin all your fun and lusting. Aerating with tines is actually not aerating. When tines are pushed into the lawn they actually push the soil particles closer together, compacting the soil tighter than it was. The only effective way to aerate sod is by pulling plugs, cores out of the bed with an aerator made specifically just for that. ...


1

Use Scott's weed and feed to begin with. In late March spread as much sand as possible. Sand tightens the grass up and suffocates the weeds.


1

I have always done this in October.Don't know if it's right or wrong but I have always aerated ,reseeded,lime n fertilize this time of year. I am in the Charlotte area of NC.


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