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This is the best picture I can find. I had one of these at my old apartment and want to get another. It grew pretty large - from maybe one foot in diameter to a few feet high and 4 feet in diameter - in less than a year. It did well both outside in the summer, and inside in colder weather. The leaves look like glossy "fingers."

my plant

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This plant is Monstera deliciosa also called Philodendron monstera. It is a vigorous climber with aerial roots. It can be bought as a potted house plant but this stage of it's life does not reveal it's talents as a climber. It can grow brown barky roots which can stick to concrete or help support it as it climbs up a tree.

I don't have many funny stories about plants but it happens I do about this one. I was doing the interior maintenance of tropical plants for a new and distinguished hotel. This one had an atrium that had good light and above the dining area was a long bed of the Monstera deliciosa.

We got an emergency call from the client one morning to come on over immediately and remove an infestation of "snakes".

It was spring and almost overnight the Monstera's had grown long brown roots over the edge of the concrete planter that were making for the dining area below. Diners were a little nervous looking up and we were told to remove them immediately. Seeing as it was breakfast we had to rip the roots off the concrete without dropping anything onto the hotel patrons below. Tricky work!

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    Thank you, and hilarious story. Actually I looked at your link and the leaves aren't quite like that (I know it's not clear from my horrible photo!). But thanks to your answer I started looking at Philodendron photos and found this one: palmtreesalesonline.com/images/Philodendronselloum.jpg - I think it's more likely that it is a Selloum. I'm going to try to get a better photo (just emailed my ex-housemate to see if she can take one).
    – Jer
    Nov 22 '13 at 13:47
  • Now called Philodendron bipinnatifidum.
    – Brenn
    Apr 29 '16 at 18:17
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    @Brenn and probably something else a few years from now, taxonomy seems to be hard and rapidly changing with the results of DNA analysis
    – kevinskio
    Apr 29 '16 at 18:18
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I know the original poster asked for identification 2 years ago but the plant in question looks to be Philodendron, maybe http://garden.org/plants/view/71882/Tree-Philodendron-Philodendron-bipinnatifidum/ http://garden.org/plants/view/613519/Philodendron-bipinnatifidum-Hope/

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This plant is now called Thaumatophyllum bipinnatifidum as it was reclassified from the Philodendron genus based on gene-sequence analysis.

Read more about it here: DNA Analysis Reveals a Genus of Plants Hiding in Plain Sight.

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