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I've been curious about a lot of vocabulary words in the world of botany. I've had quite a bit of trouble finding somewhere online to help me out, but I'm having some trouble finding a resource like that.

Optimally, I'm looking for something with diagrams of plant anatomy over the course of time, maybe some photo examples, and some sort of dictionary to accompany. Is there anything like this, online or offline that anyone knows about?

  • Check out my answer, Throsby! – VividD Nov 22 '17 at 23:57
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What is your goal? Do you want to be able to identify plants? Or do you just want to learn a little botany for learning's sake?

If you want to be able to better identify plants, you can choose between identification guides for common garden plants and guides for native (wild) plants in your area. If you are in North America, the Taylor's Encyclopedia of Garden Plants might be a good place to start for learning common garden plants. For native plants, I have two that I like to use: the Peterson's Field Guide to Wildflowers and the Newcomb's Wildflower guide. They each use slightly different methods of learning to identify plants, so are great to use for learning.

  • At the moment, I have some apple trees that have distinctly brown and woody parts at their bases. That said, they are less than 4 months old. I'm wondering (1) what the stage of life is called when the stems turn from green to covered in bark. and (2) when is that for apple trees Of those, I would say learning for learning's sake. – Throsby May 6 '13 at 3:31
  • I don't know of a good resource for that sort of information - sorry! It does sound like it would be interesting though. If you find one, please share! For your apple tree situation, I have a guess. I am assuming that your trees are grafted. The graft line is usually a couple inches above the soil. I think that what you are probably noticing is the difference in age between your rootstock and the grafted portion of the tree. – michelle May 15 '13 at 14:45
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Try Visual Dictionary Online, section Plants and Gardening.

It contains zillion of botany-related diagrams. For example, there is a diagram explaining structure of a mushroom. It explains following mushroom-related terms:

  • spores
  • stem
  • gill
  • mycelium
  • hypha
  • volva
  • ring

All diagrams are arranged in a hierarchical order, and easy to find.

On top of that, for each term, there is a button for the pronunciation!

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