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I have a berry tree in my back garden and I'm not sure if its edible. I think it might be a type of service berry but I want to make sure.

unripe fruit and leaves

unripe fruit, leaves and fingers

bark of the tree

shrub


I'm in England but I've been told it was planted here. Its not a very wooded area.

I'm pretty sure the flowers had 5 petals and where whiteish (the petals are kind of roundish not that long). The berries are red when ripe and about the size of a thumb nail. (The local birds seem to eat quite a few but I'm not quite sure) I think the tree was given to us a few years ago for free as part of a scheme to get people in the area to have more garden trees but this used to be marshland so I'm fairly sure its not native to the area.
The tree is about 2 and a half meters tall with multiple trunks.

To answer the other question the flowers don't really look like that the petals are less firmly attacked to the center than the first one and less clumped together than the last one.

Does anyone know of anything similar but how dangerous it could be?

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2 Answers 2

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I have a serviceberry in my backyard and the berries forming look just like this. The leaf structure with a central stem that veins come off alternately matches as well.

I have a book called Shrub Identification Book by George W. D. Symonds which lists these keys to identify:

  • small pink or red fruit turning purple or black
  • alternate leaves with fine serrations on the edges
  • veins on the leaves alternate rather than come from the same spot on the central vein

To be fair this book also describes the genus as large and confusing as even the definition of species in the Amelanchier genus seems a bit loose. It is a member of the rose family and also has these characteristics:

  • slow growing
  • sometimes a loose structure with no defined central leader
  • attractive to mice and rabbits
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here is a picture of the whole tree sorry the quality is bad

To asnswer the other question the flowers dont really look like that thw petals are less firmly attacked to the center than the first one and less clumped together than the last one.

Does anyone know of anything similar but dangerous it could be?

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  • Hi Erin, this site does not work like a forum. Its strictly one question and answers. Please edit you question to add additional information and delete this answer. Jun 6, 2023 at 8:46
  • @RohitGupta I think this should have been an edit, which can be difficult if the account(s) are unregistered. I don’t think the user can add info in another way at the moment. Please be nice to new users and don’t ask them to do things that the system doesn’t allow them to do.
    – Stephie
    Jun 6, 2023 at 8:51
  • Sorry i didnt know
    – Erin
    Jun 6, 2023 at 9:03
  • How do i delete it
    – Erin
    Jun 6, 2023 at 9:05
  • Don’t worry.- moderator will help sooner or later. If you want to merge accounts, check out the help center. It’s one of the reasons we recommend you register your account, then you can edit etc. as needed.
    – Stephie
    Jun 6, 2023 at 10:10

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