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I received this plant months ago from one of my students, but I haven't been able to identify it. When I first got it, it was ready to bloom and had quite a lot of flowers (that would only last for a couple of days once bloomed). Now, the flowers are gone, it grew very tall and leggy, so I need to figure out what kind of plant it is before I decide how to keep caring for it. It might need some repotting or/and a different place in my apartment, I suspect that it needs a lot more sun and space, I'm just not sure how much bigger it's going to get. Here are some pictures:

Months ago - I think the flowers look a bit similar to lilies, but much smaller Text

And now Text

Thank you in advance for the help! Any idea/suggestion would be great.

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Not a lily, but it is Mirabilis jalapa, also know as the Marvel of Peru or four o'clock flower.

From Wiki

...It is a perennial, herbaceous, bushy plant that reaches stature heights of mostly 1 meter, rarely up to 2 meters, in height. It may also be grown as an annual, especially in the temperate zone. The single-seeded fruits are spherical, wrinkled and black upon maturity, having started out greenish-yellow. The stems are thick, full, quadrangular with many ramifications and rooting at the nodes...

You can get to know about its care and a lot about other things from here and here.

Four o'clocks thrive in full sun, meaning approximately six hours of direct sunlight on most days.

So, maybe it is not getting the amout of sunlight it requires, that's why it is getting leggy. Just prune it to get new branches/ bushy look and place it somewhere bright.

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  • It has a tuber root that will regrow after cold weather if it is not frozen. They are invasive in zone 8 (US). I mow dozens. Humming birds and humming bird moths both come to the short lived flowers. Flowers are white ,yellow ,red and mixes . Aug 4, 2022 at 20:09

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