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I want to put up a 4-foot wooden fence at the back of my garden, but I'm concerned that the hedge on the other side will grow over/under/through my new fence.

On the other side of my garden is an open field with a hedge that is not maintained that grows into my garden. I have recentrly had it cut back, so I can put up a small 4-foot fence. But I'm worried that the fence will not hold back the hedge.

Also, you can see from the photos that there is a metal fence already there that seems quite sturdy.

I'm not sure what type of hedge it. I think the green bits higher up are bindweed. Hopefully, the photos will help there.

I don't mind cutting it back every few weeks. But if I put up a fence, I might not be able to get to the bottom of it and it might push through my fence.

What should I do?

EDIT: Also, what should I use to keep that hedge cut back? A hedge trimmer or chainsaw?

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3 Answers 3

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If the old iron fence is the property line, build your fence about a foot and a half (half a meter) off the old iron fence so you can go behind your fence to cut growth back regularly, unless you can come to an agreement with the other property owner to cut on the other side of that fence to keep the hedgerow under control. (Or whatever distance you find comfortable for that purpose. I guess with only a 4-foot fence planned you could reach over it to cut and have less space behind it.)

In some places you might be able to insist that the other property owner control (or maintain) their own hedgerow to keep it from encroaching on your property (rather than you having to do that,) in others you might not. That's more of a law than gardening question, though.

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  • Thanks, I like the idea of leaving a gap between the boundary metal and my new wooden fence. Is there anything that I could put between the 2 fences that would help stop the hedge growing between the fences?
    – Craig
    Apr 13 at 19:44
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I agree with the idea of erecting the fence at least a foot and a half away from the hedge so you can get behind it to cut back, especially given there's ivy growing in there, which will rapidly stick onto the fence if it's close by and grow all over it. I'm not seeing any bindweed, but if you're in the northern hemisphere, it won't be growing yet, so I think what you think is bindweed is actually ivy.

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Looks like a job for a good electric hedge trimmer. ( Don't hit the steel wire).

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