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I purchased a 2-year-old mulberry plant from the nursery. it is about 15 feet in length. When I planted it in the soil, I planted it 2 feet deep, but the actual root part with it was about 1 feet deep. So kind of planted 1 feet extra. I thought it will give it a good grip on the soil.

But now I have read that planting it too deep will kill it. Is it so? What can I do now? I planted it 2 days ago. And my soil is mostly sandy.

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As it's only been two days, dig it up carefully and replant at the same level it was in its pot or container when you bought it, no deeper, as soon as possible, don't leave it. If it was bare root, it will have been planted before lifting, so you should hopefully still be able to tell the original soil level against the stem.

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    Ok, I have moved it up yesterday. Today, its leaves are looking a little sad. I will update here on how it goes.
    – EresDev
    Mar 24 at 9:54
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    Actually, I didn't change the spot. I have only 1 spot. My soil is sandy but soil with plant was from the nursery, so it was still holding the roots all around it very much like when I have planted it. I moved it up, filled down part with soil. The whole process probably took less than 2 minutes. However, I didn't water so well because soil was already very wet. But I will keep it watering now. Isn't too much water is supposed to kill them too.
    – EresDev
    Mar 24 at 11:33
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    Yes, being constantly soaked is not good, but you jist planted this tree and the soil is sandy - all trees need watering well at initial planting, and a few gallons at least once a week in drier spells during their first year, until they've had time to grow and put out water seeking roots for themselves...till it does that, its reliant on you or extensive rainfall to supply water. Water as well once weekly if rain is very light...If you did not water yesterday, that's why its 'sad' today
    – Bamboo
    Mar 24 at 12:52
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    maybe that is why all my plants die when I move them to a new place. I have this tiny tool that tell moisture level in the soil and I don't water until it is not in dry level or close to dry level. Ok, watered it 2.5 gallons and will water again the morning as it gets very hot sunny here.
    – EresDev
    Mar 24 at 15:15
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    That will be why - whenever you move a plant, some fine root loss is inevitable, so watering thoroughly helps to offset that till the plant settles in and starts to put out replacement roots. Bear in mind its actually very hard to overwater a plant in the grouind - ti has plenty of escape rouites available to disperse so long as the surrounding soil is not saturated.
    – Bamboo
    Mar 24 at 18:58

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