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Is it better to keep them in the shade till the plant recovers? Or should they be shown sunlight? Assuming you don't know how much sunlight the plant got before being repotted.

Edit: Added images

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  • What kind of plant is it? Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 7:54
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    It is a curry leaf plant, Murraya koenigii
    – Wodin Tiw
    Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 11:34

2 Answers 2

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If the plant is dying, definitely put it in the shade. Giving it some potassium sulfate can also help.

If the plant is just shocked, and not getting damaged further, I wouldn't bother putting it in the shade (but potassium should still help). Losing leaves could be a sign that it wants less sun, though. Wilting is such a sign.

Sometimes removing the oldest leaves can help. That's a lot like shading the plant, without actually moving it. New growth can handle transplant shock better if the old growth is gone. At least, that's true for tomatoes. Not all species of plants are the same.

Okay, now that I know it's a curry leaf plant, it appears that it's normal for them to be shocked for a while when repotting (but ideally, you shouldn't repot them, or any plant, when the sun is shining, especially the afternoon and late morning sun, especially if the UV index is very far above 0). I've never grown a curry leaf plant, but I would suggest gradually reintroducing it to stronger sun when it's ready. Doing it all at once might be bad, if it's been in the shade too long. Apparently, they like a lot of sun. However, if you were to risk doing it all at once, I'd suggest doing it at about 6 PM or later.

I'm not sure how curry leaf plants respond to potassium supplementation. So, I would be conservative in the amount.

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    Some leaves have fallen, does that mean it is dying?
    – Wodin Tiw
    Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 3:37
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    Adding a photo.
    – Wodin Tiw
    Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 3:37
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    I have kept it in shade for 5 days.
    – Wodin Tiw
    Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 3:53
  • I don't know how near death it is, as I'm not familiar with this species, but based on that fact, I would recommend keeping it out of the sun for a good while. If it's not dead yet, there's a chance. If it were a tomato, five days would be quite more than enough. The wilting leaves mean it's still in shock. It's more sensitive than a tomato, it seems. Does that water drain? Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 8:07
  • I've updated my answer. Commented Jun 17, 2021 at 22:22
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If the plant is only shocked and not further destroyed, I would avoid putting it in the shadows. However, losing leaves might indicate that it prefers less light. Wilting is such an indication. Sometimes pruning the oldest leaves might be beneficial.

Ways to prevent Transplant shock:

The best time to transplant your plants is at the beginning of spring or the end of the fall season.

Transplanting on a cloudy day or in the late evening will help to prevent much water loss and wilting, as there is minimum exposure to sunlight. So, plants will get enough time to adjust to the new environment without any transplant shock.

Water the plant before transplanting. It keeps the root ball moist, so there will be fewer chances of roots getting disturbed

Watering immediately after transplanting, makes the plant adjust it to the new environment.

Remove if any dead bark, dried leaves, and foliage of the plants which are being transplanted.

Ways to minimise Transplant shock:

Dilute sugar in plain water, mix the solution thoroughly and apply it to the root zone of the plant.

Trimming helps the plant to focus on regrowth, this encourages faster recovery.

Hope you understand that prevention is better than cure even in the case of plants. Taking few more preventive measures would help your plants to refrain from transplant shock.

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