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We have a garden hand pump, which looks like this:

enter image description here

However it doesn't have a place to attach a hose to. Is there a product, which could attach a hose to the mouth of this pump?

I would need to transport the water about 50m away or something like that. What about something like that, but bigger:

enter image description here

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  • Is your water pump at the highest point in your yard? Unpressurized water won't flow through a hose unless the end of the hose is below the start of the hose.
    – csk
    Jun 2 '21 at 3:25
  • Something like this, but with a normal hose connector instead of a spigot, would let you pump directly into the bucket and connect a hose to the bucket. Of course the bucket has to be higher than the outlet of the hose, or the water will not flow the direction you want it to.
    – csk
    Jun 2 '21 at 3:32
  • @csk its pretty even unfortunately. I read up on these pumps, basically because there is no pressure I would only be splashing water up the pump right? So its pretty pointless? Jun 2 '21 at 8:04
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Water won't travel along a hose from the pump to the destination, because the water coming out of the pump isn't pressurized, and gravity is not on your side. However, you can harness gravity to do some of the work by building a mini water tower. Basically, all you need is a water tank with hose attachment, on a stand so it's elevated above the final destination of the water. Here are a few example images. I found these by searching for "homemade garden water tower" and "rain barrel irrigation system," respectively.

enter image description here source

enter image description here source

The tricky part is figuring out how tall the stand needs to be. The taller it is, the better the water pressure, and the further away from the tower you can use the hose. But you do have to lift the water all the way up to get it into the tank, so you don't want it any taller than it absolutely has to be. Here are some resources I found that might help you work it out:

From the second resource, it sounds like a tank 4 feet (1.3m) off the ground will be at least minimally enough to transport the water to a destination 50m away.

It also seems like you wouldn't actually need as large a tank as most of the examples I found. That actually works in your favor, because you can have a taller stand without making the top of the tank too tall to reach. Something like a bucket with a hose attachment might work well, and would certainly be much less expensive than a water tank or rain barrel setup. You can buy buckets with taps already attached, that you could fit a hose onto. A cheap bucket with tap costs $20-$30 (USD), so you could get one to test the concept, then upgrade to a larger container and/or a wider opening if necessary. The wider the tap opening is, the faster the water will flow, so you probably want a larger opening than the one in this example.

enter image description here source

You could use the same DIY technique to attach a tap to a wider, shallower container that would be easier to pour into. Maybe something like a gutter-style of livestock watering trough, although the ones actually intended for use by livestock will probably be larger and more expensive than what you need. Many water trough do actually come with a drain that you can attach a hose to, but usually only for troughs over 60 gal (IE, only if the trough is too large for a person to easily tip it over when full). A hanging feed trough for goats and sheep might be the right size and shape; just make sure it doesn't have holes in the bottom.

enter image description here source


Another option would be a water cart. Pump into the tank, then roll the cart to where you need the water. Easier than carrying buckets.

enter image description here source

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  • thanks, the cart idea is great. We actually have a wheel barrow and amazon sells water bags for these, so we can easily transport 80L at once instead of two watering cans with 7.5L each. Jun 3 '21 at 20:04

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