1

This succulent was presented to me. The person who presented it to me just gave 2/3 strings of the plant and asked me to plant it in a hanging pot. enter image description here

enter image description here

Its leaves are slightly reddish on the backside. enter image description here

Currently, there are some flowers on it, tiny white-violetish. enter image description here

This is all I've got. I do not think it is String of Nickels. Can anyone identify what it is ?

4
  • That soil looks a little hard, do you have some potting mix you can use?
    – kevinskio
    Feb 2 at 14:33
  • I have some vermicompost.. but I am not sure if I should use it. Should I put it there?
    – Spectra
    Feb 2 at 15:12
  • 1
    That is not going to help unless you break up the chunks in that soil. Just get some potting mix.
    – kevinskio
    Feb 2 at 18:38
  • Okay, will do so. Thanks for the input.
    – Spectra
    Feb 2 at 19:35
1

The succulent that you have is called Plectranthus Prostratus. It is also called String of Pillows. Transplant it to a more gritty medium, succulents like loose soil.

1
  • Ohh yeah..Thanks for the id.
    – Spectra
    Jul 1 at 14:44
3

This looks like a Kalanchoe. Unfortunately that doesn't narrow it down much, because there are 125 species of Kalanchoe. Many of them are common as houseplants.

It looks similar to this unidentified Kalanchoe from the Epic Gardening article, "How to Propagate Kalanchoe". This one appears to have an upright growth form, more shrub-like than vine-like.

enter image description here

Or it could be Kalenchoe uniflora, as seen in a screenshot from the Youtube video, Kalanchoe uniflora Houseplant Care.

enter image description here

Here's a cultivar of Kalenchoe uniflora, 'Freedom Bells' from Dave's Garden enter image description here

None of those options has the all-over reddish tint that your plant has. But your plant looks pretty unhappy and stressed, and some plants develop a red tint when they're unhappy. If you can get your plant in better health, its color may change a bit. Or the red color could be due to sun exposure - essentially the plant equivalent of a tan, and not necessarily a problem. Kalanchoes can handle full sun. Either way, your plant would probably appreciate some better soil. As with all succulents, make sure the potting mix drains well, and let it dry out between waterings. The easiest way to kill a succulent is to keep its potting mix wet all the time. Here's another Kalanchoe care guide.

FYI, according to VetMeds.com, Kalanchoes are poisonous to pets, so if you have a free-roaming pet, be sure to keep this plant out of their reach.

1
  • These seems close. I will do as both of you have suggested. Thanks for the links.
    – Spectra
    Feb 2 at 19:42

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.