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I was given this small Aloe several years ago. It basically never really grew until a few months ago. I find that it needs A LOT of water (I always thought they don't need so much).

I do not put it in the sunlight, or it seems to get burned (leaves get brown until it gets water, I managed to save it a few times haha).

May 2020 (underwatered):

May 2020

And today ; 7 months later: Front view

Side view shows it's all on one "plan" / "side"

I'm wondering what variety it is because that's the first Aloe I see that only grows in one "plan" (all the leaves stack on the same direction, sorry English is not my first language).

That would allow me to seek better care options for it.

Update 2021: it died :'( Overwatered it it seems

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  • After navigating through the related questions, I have come across gardening.stackexchange.com/q/18063/28266 and that plant looks very similar, and I have come across similar problems (thin leaves, browning). One answer suggests it could be an Aloe chinensis, and after Googling some images it does match but only for small specimens. Maybe my plant is just very very small?
    – Antoine
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 14:12
  • To me it seems to be the regular Aloe vera that is available everywhere where I live, but it still can be the one described in the referred answer. :) Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 14:46
  • @BenceKaulics my question was "is there such thing as regular Aloe vera"? Don't they all have a more specific name? That's what I wanted to know :)
    – Antoine
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 15:26
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    There are about 450 species of Aloe and some of those 450 have several varieties. Several species have "two rows of leaves in a flat plane" like your picture. I can't identify the exact species but while it is an Aloe I don't think it is a variety of Aloe vera.
    – alephzero
    Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 16:59
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    @alephzero The plant in question seems to be the same as mine which was growing in a flat plane for a very long time. Then I moved it and started to twist so the new leaves would reach towards the window. Commented Jan 21, 2021 at 17:57

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