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I have a wonderful raised veggie bed. This is the first year in 10 years that I've had a problem. I've planted kale, chili peppers, cilantro, and now cabbage. Everything has been eaten over night. Like it was never there. I've gone out at night hoping to find something. I've put down sluggo to no avail. I wrapped the bed in chicken wire. I've put copper tape around the perimeter. And still whatever it is is eating whatever I plant. Does anyone have any idea what it could be? I have now put nematodes in. Because I have found some little white rolls polly looking bugs in the soil. Now I'm inspecting the soil. This is beyond frustrating!! any ideas??

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    sluggo's don't work 100%. When a slug has the choice between a juicy plant or a sluggo pallet, it will go for the plant. Also, those anti slug pallets don't kill instantly. It usually takes a while for the slug to die. In the mean time it can keep on destroying your seedlings
    – Maurice
    Nov 9 '20 at 21:57
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    also i wouldn't use chicken wire because the slugs and other insects can crawl right through that. Use insect mesh instead. Make a tall border around your plot using insect mesh of about 1 meter in height at minimum. Higher would be even better.
    – Maurice
    Nov 9 '20 at 21:59
  • If they disappeared overnight ,it is an animal like a rabbit. Nov 10 '20 at 16:05
  • Good and helpfully detailed question; if could include an overall illustration, a closer illustration of the surface, a close illustration of & size of the rolly bugs, height of your raised garden bed, region, average daytime & night time temperatures, humidity, soil type, size of the holes in the wire, and current watering amount & schedule, could also be helpful. We encourage you to take the Tour, and browse through the Help center, to learn more about how the site works! Thank you! Welcome to the site!
    – M H
    Nov 16 '20 at 18:41
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Although it's often said that pillbugs (AKA rollypollies) are harmless, they will mow down seedlings, sometimes, especially if there's a lot of uncomposted organic matter near them. To stop them from doing this, just pick up all the pillbugs and put them somewhere else. Then, remove all the uncomposted organic matter from around the seedlings (so as not to attract new pillbugs). They shouldn't bother your plants after that.

Other possibilities are cutworms, flea beetles, rodents, rabbits, and other animals.

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