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Can anyone tell me what this is? It's in a front garden in North London. Seems to survive with little care from what I've seen.

enter image description here

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  • Next time: one identification per question. Do no worry to add many questions in a single day (but there are some limits for new users). This is a reference site, so later (for people reaching us from google) it will be easier with get image and answer. Mar 2 '20 at 8:38
  • Giacomo is right. I have removed one of the pictures. Feel free to ask a second question with it. Hint: You can go to the edit history of your post and copy what you need.
    – Stephie
    Mar 4 '20 at 8:06
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I do not think this is a prunus laurocerasus. If it has leathery leaves and brown/rusty hairs underneath it is a Magnolia Grandiflora - they are big trees eventually.

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This is Prunus laurocerasus, common name cherry laurel. I wouldn't recommend it frankly - it gets 25 x 25 feet eventually, although its a good large shrub/small tree for shady areas. I note the wall behind it is tipping over - this shrub produces lots of large and deep woody roots, so it really shouldn't be planted close to any structure like a wall.

UPDATE: There has been an alternative ID suggestion of Magnolia grandiflora; on closer inspection of the image, that is a possibility, though I'm not seeing the density of hairs beneath the foliage one would normally expect. There are also no signs it produced flowers last summer/autumn, although they don't usually flower much before 12 years old anyway. In the UK, these can reach a height of about 12 metres, with a spread of 8 metres. The flowers are white, fragrant and cupshaped; Prunus laurocerasus, on the other hand, produces upright 'candles' of small white flowers, usually in May.

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  • Yes, doesn't look as brown under the leaves as I would expect of magnolia. Mar 5 '20 at 21:14

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