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This white mass has started growing at the base of this tree, we are curious what it might be? any thoughts appreciated. Were thinking it is some kind of fungus, but would love to know more. I am also not sure what type of tree this is.

This white mass has started growing at the base of this tree, we are curious what it might be? any thoughts appreciated. Were thinking it is some kind of fungus, but would love to know more. I am also not sure what type of tree this is.

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There are many fungi that appear on tree trunks, including Polyporales. Which one it is hard to say, it will depend on a number of factors. Perhaps if you tell us more about the tree with clear photos of leaves and branches it would help.

Fungi on wood are generally opportunistic, taking advantage of a chink in the armour of a healthy tree, profiting from the existence of soft punky wood rather than creating soft wood from healthy tissue. If your concern is really about the health of the tree, you might examine more closely where the fungus is attached, and use a pointed probe of some kind to see how punky the wood is in that area by pushing the probe into the tree to see what resistance there is. Start on an apparently solid area of bark to get an idea of what solid wood feels like, then probe the area around the fungus.

If you feel a lot of softness in the area and the tree is potentially a risk to other property then call someone to take a look. Sometimes it is just a surface wound, but it can also indicate the one exterior sign of a severe rot inside the heartwood of the tree, in which case the structural stability of the tree becomes an issue.

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It's really hard to tell from your photo quite what that is on your tree - the picture looks like its been taken on a foggy day! Please check this Q & A for the images shown to see if yours looks similar Does anyone know what this is on my plum tree?

If it doesn't and is more like a mushroom or shelf fungus, a clearer photograph would be helpful. Regardless, this type of growth may not bode well for the tree's long term survival.

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