1

My take is that it has simple alternate entire, acuminate, leaves with pinnate vein system, but it is tough to tell because the lowest branches are high up.

The tree grows at the shore of a river (riparian clue?). It is obviously in poor shape, so there aren't all that many samples at ground level - and the few that land on the ground are probably raked away by the park landscapers.

I didn't see any fruit. Perhaps the trunk is a good lead.

Here are some images:

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It may be time to accept the answer (Ulmus pumila) after finding these two leaves on the ground - doubly serrated margins and herringbone vein pattern:

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  • In what country and in what part of that country is the tree located? – Jurp Oct 25 '19 at 1:06
  • I included that in the title: The Northeast of the USA. – Toni Oct 25 '19 at 1:07
  • Looks like my reading comprehension skills are lacking today... – Jurp Oct 25 '19 at 1:09
  • Looks a bit like a Siberian Elm, although the leaves aren't as saw-tooth edged. But it sure looks trashy enough to be one :-) – DCookie Oct 25 '19 at 1:40
  • @DCookie Right... It's the apparently smooth margins of the leaves... At least from the distance... – Toni Oct 25 '19 at 1:43
3

My suggestion would be Bebb's Willow alias Salix Bebbiana. The bark is a good clue, plus the overall untidiness of the dead and dying twigs hanging on at the ends of branches. It looks like a major branch has died out but is still partly in place but has not healed over, also signalling willow. Riparian fits, plus alternate leaves. The leaves are a bit misleading, they are rounder than other willows and that is why I chose Bebb's which is somewhat variable but often has much wider leaves than on other willows which are characteristically narrow. According to description this example could be almost full size for the tree. Against this idea is that this is a single tree, where Bebbs often produces multiple stems.

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