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I recently took this plant over from a friend. I transplanted it over the summer and kept it outside, then recently moved it inside. I'm in Zone 5 and it just started getting below 50 F at night. It has pretty thin leaves that don't like direct sunlight all day outside in the 80+ degree temps. It recently started getting these small new leaves, which are like little yellow canoes, with little pistils inside. They might be the flower, not sure. And not sure if they are supposed to be yellow. Anyway, any ideas what this is? It is a pretty old plant, maybe 10 years even. I think it may be a Bird of Paradise. Obviously it's not going to get the tropical flowers.

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It's an Aglanoema, commonly known as Chinese Evergreen. The little canoe like things are the flowers, although the outside sheath is a spathe - the flowers are actually on the pistil object inside.

You're right in that they do not appreciate direct sunlight, but they do like medium to bright daylight. There are lots of varieties, some of them with quite a lot of red and pink in the variegation, and those ones need bright daylight in order to retain their colour. Care instructions https://www.joyusgarden.com/aglaonema-chinese-evergreen-care/

  • Bamboo, thank you so much for the answer and info. I looked up what the flowers are supposed to look like. I think I gave it too much water after I was worried that I left it outside in the sun too long. I just moved it to a south facing window where it can get probably 6 hours of direct early day bright sun. My upstairs window would basically give it sunlight from sun up to sun down. But I'm not trying to take that pot upstairs! That's where my succulents live! Thanks again! – Jay73220 Oct 14 at 21:26
  • Its better without sun - just bright daylight. – Bamboo Oct 14 at 23:19

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