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I purchased this guy about three weeks back but couldn't ID it. What is it called and how do I best care for it?

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    No ID for it, but keep in in full sunlight. Many plants are actually red coloured, except they produce lots of chlorophyll which is green. If the light levels are low, the plant produces more chlorophyll to compensate, and the red colour is hidden by the green. – alephzero Jul 19 at 14:00
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    Can you add another photo taken from the top so we can see inside the top leaves please? – Bamboo Jul 19 at 16:07
  • @alephzero, I always thought succulents in general preferred low light. It's a good thing I haven't tried to grow any! Thanks for the education! – Sue Saddest Farewell TGO GL Jul 19 at 19:14
  • @Sue It depends on the species. Many do grow in low light and relatively high rainfall areas, such as tropical forests. Others grow in hot semi-desert regions, e.g. aloes. Others grow in cooler "alpine" conditions. e.g. sedums.Some species of cactus (e.g. some opuntias) survive being "freeze dried" below thick snow cover each winter - though they can't tolerate daily freezing and thawing in less extreme winter climates. – alephzero Jul 19 at 20:38
  • There is a family of succulents that grow like that en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crassulaceae but there are a bunch of genera that aren't really distinguishable by gross morphology (ie one plant in genus A could look very similar to a plant in genus B, but have different flowers, etc.), could be in Crassula, Sedum, Kalanchoe, Cotyledon.... – Grady Player Jul 19 at 22:04
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It is most likely Echeveria, specifically E. coccinea rosea. There are images of this plant lower down in this link http://n-s-succulents.co.uk/Echeverias-a-h.php.

Echeveria need lots of bright light and particularly sunlight, otherwise their typical rosette form becomes elongated, stretched out, so find a sunny spot indoors where it can live. You should allow it to dry out between waterings, and like your other succulent, never leave any water in the outer pot or tray after watering. Further care instructions here https://www.hortmag.com/plants/plants-we-love/echeveria-plant-care-indoors

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