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I have been reading about symbiotic plants and mutualism and I am wondering which plant to introduce to the pot of my perennial chilli plant.

Any hints?

thanks!

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This symbiotic communication might be happening, plants DO communicate after all. But plants planted next to plants don't change any chemistry. These plants are literally competing for chemicals, water, air, light and room. No way could another plant be beneficial in this pot with your Chili! How big is this plant? How big is the pot? What soil medium have you used? What fertilizer?

Plants planted together WISELY in the garden proper out of doors, offer shade and wind protection. Moisture retention.If there are too many plants, then there will be a blockage of air, of aeration. Perfect environment for fungus.

Where is it that you live? Must be subtropical for you to imagine a Chili plant being a perennial, right? Winters make them annuals in the North. Tomatoes are also a perennial turned annual up here but I think I will always treat them as a one season crop and then start again.

There is no magic to plants, to life. Plants that evolved together do have symbiotic recognition but nothing that does either plant any good. They would never DEPEND on one another because that would be a pretty dumb way to survive. I've got some juicy analogies but save those for later.

Logical reasoning dictates that plants with the same needs, same environments needing the same temperatures, similar soils, very similar water management and fertilizer formulations should be planted together. If there is ROOM.

Make sure you use JUST plain old potting soil. Sterilized potting mix/medium/soil.

No gimmicks such as water holding gels or sponges and definitely no fertilizer.

No rocks, gravel or packing peanuts for ‘drainage’ at the bottom of the pot. Does just the opposite.

You want to be in charge of the fertilizer. Get a small bottle of Osmocote 14–14–14 use HALF of what the directions tell you.

Growing veggies is a bit different than growing flowering plants. I plant large pots and hanging baskets with FLOWERS and ornamental plants such as grasses, for clients. PACKED with plants. These mass plantings are expected to last but one season. There will be a mix of perennials and annuals. The perennials will be transplanted into the garden in the fall.

The flower pots and hanging baskets are out of doors where there is lots of wind, air. Watering is managed so that the plants themselves do not get too wet...Lush, happy plants. Enough resources for all. Just enough resources for all, not too MUCH. Thinning helps a lot. Pulling out any dead, dying or ineffective growth!

If you are imagining Chilis forming on an indoor plant...you will need an awful lot of light and the light of a southern kitchen window is just not enough for reproductive growth. You can try, some people have actually gotten tomatoes and chillis from the kitchen window lighting.

If you could find a fertilizer that is LOW in Nitrogen in relation to the P and the K that would help promote reproductive growth. Instead of the Osmocote. Not BOTH. During the winter the amount of hours during the day that a plant gets light is far too little to grow vegetables. Using artificial lights you are able to dictate the intensity and daylight time schedule and the SPECTRUM of the light.

Use only potting soil!! Okay?

Look up the documentary called, "What Do Plants Talk About"...you will love this film about plants and communication and INTELLIGENCE! Also, Jorge Cervantes "The Cannabis Encyclopedia"...even though this is written about ONE PLANT this information is applicable to all plants...the detail is incredible! Very scientific but understandable!

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