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I got this echinacea from a small nursery that could not tell me the exact latin and cultivar name of this species, except that they got seeds by a special order from abroad. To their credit, I had never seen such one!

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UPDATE:

The pollen was almost white, so this pointed to pallida. However, I collected the seed, and they look like regular Echinacea purpurea seed, but are smaller, and whitish. Actually, the color is more similar to simulata seed color. (head-banging-against-the-wall)

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There’s two Echinaceas with droopy thin ray flowers and also with thin, hairy, scratchy leaves: pallida and simulata. They are presumably very closely related, and I’ve never really figured them out beyond the rule that apparently pallida has white pollen and simulata has yellow pollen. That’s what the Flora of the Southern and Mid-Atlantic States uses as the distinguishing feature, although I’ve scratched my head about it in the field.

FWIW, here’s The Flora of North America’s take:

Echinacea pallida Ray corollas pink to reddish purple, 3–4 mm wide; pollen usually white, some-times lemon yellow; cypselae glabrous

Echinacea simulata Ray corollas rose to pink or white, 4–7 mm wide; pollen yellow; cypselae (rays) hairy (n Arkansas, se Missouri, eastward)

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    The coolest Echinaca, btw, in my opinion is Echinacea tennesseensis. – Yewge Jun 17 '19 at 3:29
  • Thank you for the answer. I will pay more attention on polen color. I have several of these, and they flowering time is little staggered because of place and microclimate, so it should be easy for me to catch polen color. I don't remember any yellow color, it is then probably pallida. – Aleksandar M Jun 17 '19 at 6:26
  • What is interesting is bee behavior. They behave a little cautiosly towards this echinacea. As if they do not know the newcomer, still exploring if it is good. So, they are not crazy, but are visiting.When Penstemon barbatus flowered first, that was the love at the first site, but Echinacea is some other kind of love. – Aleksandar M Jun 17 '19 at 6:31

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