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I posted a similar question, but now the owner won't let me cut a branch to regrow. So I'm posting this question with another type of tree/plant.

I was driving through an abandoned lot and saw these plants. I would like to cut a branch (or something), take it home and somehow regrow it in a big pot on my rooftop. Is this possible with these plants? I don't what type of plants these are, so here are some pictures.

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    I feel that since it's 2 plants it should be 2 questions. – black thumb Apr 4 at 17:10
  • Please decide which plant you want to ask about (hint: it’s perfectly acceptable to ask two questions...) and edit this post accordingly. If you ask about two different plants, you will likely get just general “various methods for cuttings” and not answers that fit for the specific plant. – Stephie Apr 6 at 11:22
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There are three basic techniques (at least) that you can try, depending on the time of year. Some work better than others for different species of plants, so you might want to try all of them over the course of a year.

Spring and early summer: softwood cuttings.

Late summer to mid autumn: semi-ripe cuttings.

Mid autumn to late winter: hardwood cuttings.

In terms of the amount of "tender loving care" required, softwood cuttings need the most, and hardwood need none at all - just stick them in the ground, forget about them and come back in spring to see which ones are sprouting leaves.

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The plant with pink/red flowers look like Bougainvillea. They are common plants here in Arizona (not native, though). The downside is that they are frost-tender so if the temps get down to freezing or below it will damage the plant. It usually doesn't kill them.

The yellow flowered plant looks like a Hibiscus. We had some when I lived in a semi-tropical environment. They don't tolerate temps below freezing.

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    If they are growing well on "an abandoned lot", that's a pretty good guide that they tolerate the local climate without any human assistance. – alephzero Apr 5 at 9:21

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