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I noticed that hog panel fencing is a lot cheaper than pipe fencing, and was wondering will the hog panel fencing hold up the weight of different vegetables ranging from kiwiberry to cucumbers (maybe a small watermelon)?

How should I determine how many t-posts I need?

migrated from diy.stackexchange.com Mar 10 at 17:33

This question came from our site for contractors and serious DIYers.

  • Can you provide the size of the panel? And how are you orienting the panel? – UnhandledExcepSean Mar 10 at 12:54
  • I'm thinking the 16' 4 gauge standard panels you can find at hardware stores. – black thumb Mar 10 at 16:25
  • I moved this here because it's a question about what to use to support some vining vegetables and fruits, so likely to get answers from people who grow those plants. – Niall C. Mar 10 at 17:39
  • This is a fence construction question, not a gardening question. – black thumb Mar 10 at 23:13
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Hog panels are made of pretty heavy gauge wire. As long as the supports holding them upright are strong enough to support the weight you should be fine. The support ability of the ground is really the deciding factor.

T posts are one way to support the hog fence. You just need to find t posts long enough to make a good bite into the ground.

Here's an example of t post hog wire fencingenter image description here

https://www.google.com/amp/s/allaspectsfencing.com/t-post-support-wire-for-your-fence/amp/

I've used hog wire to make locking cages for tool storage and I can tell you it's pretty strong but it is a little floppy. If you have hanging fruit densely packed, high winds may pose a problem.

  • this is a copy/paste answer – black thumb Mar 10 at 16:26
  • I'm not sure what you mean – Joe Fala Mar 10 at 17:24
  • @blackthumb What do you mean by this being a "copy/paste" answer? – Niall C. Mar 10 at 20:07
  • @NiallC. think about the gardening site no plagiarism rule – black thumb Mar 10 at 23:11
  • @blackthumb if you see something that doesn’t follow the rules described here, flag a moderator and clearly describe the problem, including the undisclosed source. – Stephie Mar 11 at 5:06

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