1

enter image description here

enter image description here

As you can see in the first picture my Aloe vera is thinner than the one in the second picture and I was just wondering if this is normal (maybe because it’s a younger plant). I wasn’t really sure and kind of afraid that I was maybe over-watering or not watering enough. Also the leaves are turning brown and soft at some parts.

Is this normal or not?

1

Looking at your photos, it would seem that they are two different plants (i.e. not two clones of the same plant). They both might be "Aloe vera" as the species is quite variable. However, there are several species within the genus Aloe. One of your plants might be misnamed and could be a different species of Aloe. Either way, they are beautiful plants and yours look quite healthy. The Wikipedia link below describes some of the variability.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aloe_vera

| improve this answer | |
  • Quite variable. – Wayfaring Stranger Feb 19 '19 at 17:10
  • Okay, thanks I just thought they were the same kind and that’s why it seemed a little weird to me that the look so different – Tali Feb 19 '19 at 20:02
1

The more upright plant I suspect is Aloe barbadensis, which is also known as Aloe vera. They are generally more upright and don't offset as vigorously as other species. The other one clearly has a lot of offsets and the leaves are closer to horizontal.

You mention leaves turning brown and soft, where on the plant are they located? Are they the outer-most leaves? If so this may be normal. If they are the leaves in the center that may indicate a more serious issue.

From the pictures, they look pretty good to me.

| improve this answer | |
  • Well the leaves in the center seem pretty okay to me it’s rather the outer leaves that are a little soft and have brownish tips. If those aloes are different types I guess it’s okay that they’re a little different, I was just scared that something was wrong with the first one – Tali Feb 19 '19 at 20:01
  • There is plenty of natural variations within species, for instance, your Aloe vera has fewer white dots than I normally see, but within the range of normal. Aloe and most plants shed outer/older leaves as they get worn out and is nothing to worry about. Aloe is often used in landscaping around here and it really is difficult to kill once it gets established, unless they are frost-tender. – Tim Nevins Feb 19 '19 at 20:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.