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We have this potted plant indoors that we bought in a garden shop about a year ago. It is now getting sick, so I am trying to research how to treat it. However, first I would like to know which species it even is. Can anyone help?

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  • Unfortunately, I can't ID the plant (I'd like to know what it is, too - it has interesting leaves). I have a couple of questions regarding its health - it looks like you have it in a plastic pot inside of a decorative pot. Is this right? And, is the plastic pot high enough above the base of the decorative pot so that the plant never sits in water? – Jurp Dec 18 '18 at 11:54
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    You may be keeping this plant indoors but I don't think it is an indoor plant. Where in the world are you? – kevinsky Dec 18 '18 at 22:47
  • @kevinsky Oslo. – Revetahw says Reinstate Monica Dec 18 '18 at 22:50
  • Hard to ID now its in this poor condition - ever seen any flowers on it? I also suspect it might not actually be a houseplant, but something that is normally grown outdoors... – Bamboo Dec 19 '18 at 1:16
  • @Jurp Yes, there's a inner plastic pot. I'll check regarding the water thing. – Revetahw says Reinstate Monica Dec 19 '18 at 5:13
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It looks like a plumeria, by the shape of the leaves. It's an outdoor plant and needs lots of sun. If you have the space, I would put it outdoors.

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It looks like a Corokia cotoneaster. I think yours is too gone to treat. I think it was overwatered. See if it is waterlogged. Does that pot have holes in the bottom. If not get it a new pot. But, I would start over with a new plant. Those small leaves can easily dry out, but they are known to be drought resistant. There is the possibility that the leaves just dried out and the plant will leaf out again. I personally have never seen a Corokia grown as an indoor plant. They are not the hardiest of all plants only cold hardy to Zone 8, but I have no experience growing them indoor. I have grown them in pots outdoor and have dried them out to the point of no return, because plants are only drought resistant in the ground not in a pot. I have also seen them desiccated by cold winds. Do you have a heat vent or radiator near by that could have dried out the plant? Feature on growing Corokia in the PNW by the University of Washington Corokia

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