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A year ago, my grandmother gave me a cutting from her jade plant and it has grown a little since that time. I repotted it about a week ago because the pot it was in was beginning to get too small. I used a 50/50 mix of organic potting soil and sandy dirt and I water it whenever the soil feels and looks dry. It sits in full sun for about 4 hours a day (I live in the UK so the light intensity is not extreme)

Here's a picture of it at the moment:

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/5062494/junk/jade_plant_23-05-2012.JPG

It grows REALLY slowly (my chilli plants I bought a week ago have grown as much as the money plant has done in a year)

Can I make it grow faster? If so, how? Also, is there anything I can do to make the trunk grow thicker and taller? (I want it less bushy and more tall + tree like.)

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  • Jade plants are slow growers. I started a couple Hobbit Jades from leaves 3-4 years ago. They're now about a foot high. They really like to sit out in summer sun. Bring them out gradually as they are quite sensitive to sun scald. In 4 years you'll have a nice plant. in a decade, you'll have a monster. If you want more, just start with leaves and rooting hormone. They're tough and will grow for you. Yours soil mix is about what I use, and I've been growing jade since the early 1970's. – Wayfaring Stranger Feb 26 at 19:09
  • I got about 1 foot for 4 years years growth. These aren't annuals, they were perennials. – Wayfaring Stranger Feb 26 at 19:21
  • Oh yes, growth hormones like gibberellins or auxins are cheating and will give you a funny looking plant. Be patient. – Wayfaring Stranger Feb 28 at 22:22
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A plant tends to put on more top growth when it is pot bound. So, don't re pot it for at least five years. You can pinch out the top leaf set and it may branch out.

Another way to make it look bushier is to detach a leaf from the stem, let it dry for a week and then put it in the soil. It will grow roots and start a new stem.

Fresh soil and lower light levels imply there is no need for fertilizer for a few years. If you do fertilize this could result in the kind of growth that will attract pests who like juicy soft new leaves.

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