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I have been given these chillies as a gift so that I can re-plant them next summer. Could anyone please help me with the names?

List of chillies

  • What a selection! You must have the seed packets you used? There is no way anyone could ID all these peppers without the plant and its leaves, without knowing the stage these peppers are in. Some might be turning red or purple if allowed to ripen. We also need scale, a penny or something. Do you have the plants these were plucked from still? Grins, I know one is a jalapeno! – stormy Sep 13 '18 at 4:33
  • Have you grown chilis before? Any vegetables ever? Getting seed from these chilis means you have no idea of the genetics because only mommy might be known. The daddy who pollinated these might be the same plant or your neighbor's plant. Gathering seed from the food you eat, the plants you've purchased at the grocery store or even from a friend will never make seeds you know the genetics. The best way until SHTF to get seed is to purchase certified, NON GMO seed that has known mommy and daddy genotypes. Seed that has been created to be resistant to certain diseases from fungi and bacteria – stormy Sep 13 '18 at 4:38
  • I do not think we can name them. There are so many different varieties of chili, often sharing the fruit form. One need 3 fruit per sort to give a guess, but having picture of the plant helps (colour of leaves and flowers, fruits going up or down, colour of new fruits, habits of the plant, ...). Additionally, it is probable that the chili were cultivated together, so the form (and hot) is not much related to the plant which will growth from seeds. – Giacomo Catenazzi Sep 13 '18 at 6:18
  • I would just plant all of them and let me surprise. You may eat them (just keep the seed). – Giacomo Catenazzi Sep 13 '18 at 6:19
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There are thousands of breeds of peppers, and many of them look the same. People breed lots of new ones every year. An educated chile grower could tell you fruit shape names, probable species names, and stuff like that, but I wouldn't expect to know the breed names just by the way they look.

I can tell you that that long pepper on the far left is really cool. It's got corking, which is supposed to be indicative of increased flavor, although I'm not sure how true that is; the pictures I've seen of peppers with corking were primarily Jalapeños (so that one may have a Jalapeño in its ancestry); it's got a shape like a Serrano. The pepper next to it might be some kind of Jalapeño. The red one two from the right might be a Fresno. You might have a Pimento in there. These are all guesses, though.

That one on the upper-right looks like Capsicum baccatum (the breed names of that species usually start with Aji), considering the thin stem (but I could be wrong). The others all look like Capsicum annuum.

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