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I have a small area of Bermuda grass in my lawn, roughly 30 square feet or so. I had a plan of getting rid of it by digging the area up in the fall, right before my yard is aerated and reseeded with a normal fescue type grass. I would then use Turflon Ester next growing season to spray and kill any remaining Bermuda grass.

Or would it be better to start spraying the Bermuda now with the Turflon to start killing it, and then dig up the area prior to aeration/reseeding?

  • No, I like your first idea more. The second idea isn't going to help with the process of digging it up or anything. These chemicals basically cause the weeds to rot which means pulling them up / digging them up will just be harder. – Rob Aug 9 '18 at 16:28
  • @Rob thanks for your comment. In my opinion, you could make this an answer. One last question, with the deep roots they can have, do I just remove it kind or like a sod layer? From what I read it doesn’t seem like the rhizomes go super deep but I’m not entirely sure. – DrZoo Aug 10 '18 at 1:49
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No, I like your first idea more. The second idea isn't going to help with the process of digging it up or anything. These chemicals basically cause the weeds to rot which means pulling them up / digging them up will just be harder.

To address your second question, yes. Just remove as though you were going to remove a layer of sod. As you said you had plans for spraying Turflon down afterwards so any remaining embedded roots are going to die, regardless.

It is very similar to a scaled down removal that I do from time to time when I am dealing with stubborn weeds that are hard to pull, such as dandelions. Rather than just spray them and let them rot in the sun (which I find makes lawns look worse) what I do is pull up what I can and spray the exposed roots.

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    Ditto on digging the dandelions by hand. I removed a lot by hand, hundreds I'd assume, when I first moved into my home and sprayed the root as I removed them. The next spring, I had a whopping two dandelions show up. Granted I have a smaller yard, something like a half acre or a bit less, so manual work is doable. – DrZoo Aug 10 '18 at 16:02

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