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Zone 7, 6ft high, multistem, loved by bees, grows every year anew by itself, fairly good ground competitor, didn't notice any fragrance.

Some of the leaves are lobed, majority not.

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    Need to see the foliage too... – Bamboo Aug 2 '18 at 20:43
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    Definitely need the foliage; I'm thinking it's a tithonia, but need the leaves to be sure. – Jurp Aug 2 '18 at 20:50
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It's most likely Tithonia rotundifolia (common name is Mexican sunflower). A great plant: tall, wide, floriferous and excellent for pollinators. I used to grow it (or the Torch cultivar) when I had larger gardens. Here are some photos:

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2

Echinachea in hot warm colors

Most echinachea I know are cool colors such as purples and pinks. I didn't know that you could get this color from echinachea. Gorgeous. But I could be wrong...so we'll wait for others to input their views. Please send foliage pictures as well!

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  • Definitely not an echinacea - the cone is wrong. Note how in your photo the cone flowers are blooming in bands, not all at once. The number of rays is wrong, too. Also, although Echinacea paradoxa can reach 4.5 feet, I doubt that any species or cultivar hits 6 feet. – Jurp Aug 3 '18 at 13:56
2

That is a Sulphur Cosmos I believe.

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0

Possibly a variety of Bur Marigold (Bidens). Bidens are known for attractiveness to bees.

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