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This photo was taken in the Conway National Park in Queensland, Australia. Would anyone know what this is?

enter image description here

  • A little clarification please - its not clear from the image whether the white petals higher up are part of the same plant; I'm also seeing what might be modified petioles adapted for climbing, not sure if they're on the same plant, and its also not clear which leaves belong to what... there are linear grassy leaves, and some other type of broader leaf which can't be seen clearly.Its definitely not a passiflora, and if it is an orchid, its much more likely to be one that is indigenous to the area, given the location, but I'm not even sure its an orchid without knowing what the foliage is like – Bamboo Jul 26 '18 at 12:54
  • A clue as how tall this plant is would be good too - it looks from the image as if its low growing and is actually growing in grass - whether that's the case or not, we don't know... – Bamboo Jul 26 '18 at 12:55
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The plant in your photo is not an orchid (which is a monocot group with a distinctive fused anter/stigma structure called a column). The plant in your photo is a member of the genus Passiflora or Passion fruit. There are many species of this genus distributed in tropical regions around the world. The following characteristics identify it as a species of the genus Passiflora:

-The plant appears to be a vine with tri-lobed leaves having reticular veins.

-A tri-lobed stigma arising from a superior ovary.

-The five anthers (difficult to see all five) just below the ovary.

-There are visible corona filaments seen just above the petals below.

The flower in the photo appears to be old and somewhat dried/distorted, but all of the distinctive Passion fruit flower elements are present. Here are some external links that may be helpful.

https://www.gardendesign.com/flowers/passion.html

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passiflora

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passiflora_edulis

  • Maybe Passiflora manicata – benn Jul 26 '18 at 13:12
  • There is no way it is Passiflora manicata. – Aleksandar M Jul 26 '18 at 15:04
  • don't forget the curly climbing-tendrils too. – Lorel C. Jul 26 '18 at 15:29
  • Passiflora is definitely the correct identification. I was with a friend - who actually asked me to photo this flower for him. He said what it was but I'd forgotten what he'd said. I now remember him saying it may have been a passionfuit flower and that there were others in the area. I even saw a passionfuit on the ground in the area too. – tdrsam Jul 29 '18 at 23:52
  • I was wondering about link P.manicata as well @b.nota But it could be link P.coccinea or link P.edmundoi as well. – tdrsam Jul 30 '18 at 0:02
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This is an orchide of the Philiphines:

http://www.rv-orchidworks.com/orchidtalk/orchids-other-genera-bloom/28001-cymbidium-sp-aff-bicolor-philippine-orchids.html

CYMBIDIUM BICOLOR

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    I guess a google image search is not always right... This does not look like a Orchid at all, it more resembles an Iris or Lily. – benn Jul 26 '18 at 8:51
  • No way it is an iris or a lily. – Aleksandar M Jul 26 '18 at 9:24
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    I do not think it is the true identification: look the pistils and stames: these are not from orchids (and also not trimeres). Also the leaves. – Giacomo Catenazzi Jul 26 '18 at 10:11
  • I don't say they are Iris or Lily, I say they resemble more (than Orchid). If I was sure about what it is I would give an answer, not a comment. – benn Jul 26 '18 at 10:20
  • I didn't comment what you said, just expressed my opinion that it is not an iris or a lily. – Aleksandar M Jul 26 '18 at 14:58

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