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Zone 7. What is this decorative tree in a park?

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    You have been asked so many times: could you please at least add the continent? We don’t ask for a street address or city, but especially with “wild” plants, knowing where in the world (country? region?) they grow helps the answerers to do a plausibility check. Apart from that, nice photos! – Stephie Jul 24 '18 at 10:48
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    @Stephie: It's planted in a park. I had the experience of finding a high-altitude European fir tree growing in Southern California in a park at less than a thousand feet. – Joshua Jul 24 '18 at 15:39
  • @Joshua correct. But in this case, the comment addresses a general issue, not so much this post. – Stephie Jul 24 '18 at 15:50
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It's a Redbud. If you're in the US, that could be Cercis canadensis (Eastern Redbud), Cercis chinensis (Chinese Redbud), or two sub-species of Cercis canadensis, the Mexican and Oklahoma Redbuds. The Chinese Redbud is the smallest of these trees, with the others are approximately 20-25 feet tall and 20 feet wide. They're not a particularly fast-growing tree, but very pretty when in bloom in spring. The Eastern Redbud also has nice (yellow) fall color.

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    I agree, although the blossom would be the give away - bright pink blossom before the leaves in spring, for the Eastern Redbud. Agree, slow growing. The house here has what must be the oldest I've ever seen, but it is slowly dying. Luckily it gives us lots of volunteers so we have lots of saplings for the future... – winwaed Jul 24 '18 at 13:32

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