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I have onion grass all over my lawn and the lawn reeks of onion when mowing. I have been told that pulling them up should NOT be done because if you accidentally leave even the smallest part of the bulb it will regrow and spread rapidly.

Is this correct or should I religiously pull them as I see them grow? The soil is a very heavy clay soil and trying to dig them out meticulously, some of the bulbs are absolutely tiny and it would be extremely time consuming.

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Many years later, but just came across the same issue.

I keep finding the same remedies

  1. Mow regularly to prevent onion grass from going to seed.

  2. Remove the entire bulb. So long as any part of the bulb remains, onion grass can regrow.

  3. Pour boiling water. Scalding hot water will kill just about any plant. Target with specific herbicide after mowing.

  4. Target with specific herbicide after mowing. Herbicide use should be used as a last resort.

Above summarised from What Is Onion Grass (Allium vineale) & How To Get Rid Of It. And I am not associated with the website.


So, I guess keep mowing regularly and keep pulling them out. Even if you leave a tiny bulb, it is still better than not pulling the rest out.

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  • As stated in the question, "I have been told that pulling them up should NOT be done because if you accidentally leave even the smallest part of the bulb it will regrow and spread rapidly". Yet, you are suggesting the opposite with the guess that it is better than not pulling them out. The first suggestion helps slow the spread but doesn't stop them. 2 reiterated my point, 3 is possible but an expensive resolution with today's fuel prices, 3&4 will kill the lawn too would it not? Apr 20, 2023 at 5:32
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    If you don't dig it up, it's in the ground already and is growing rapidly. So, take your pick May 20, 2023 at 12:54
  • @RohitGupta I actually embrace it - I think it is a pretty looking plant and enjoy cutting some of it and chopping it in to my scrambled eggs, or adding it to cream cheese gives them a lift. It always seems to die back by itself (in the spring I think? )
    – davidgo
    Jan 15 at 9:29
  • I have greatly reduced mine by digging after rains, using for soup stock as the best revenge. The idea that 'leaving one bulb' causes havoc is exaggerated. Let them live around deer & rabbit desirables, since those guys hate them. Jan 15 at 14:39

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