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We've had it growing in our backyard lawn for a while and the patch gets bigger every year. Its definitely in the succulent family but I can't find any other information on it. We live in West Michigan if it helps. Its very strange- Help internet!

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    Stackexchange contributors are located in many countries and to help us all understand your problem better, we appreciate a little extra information such as your physical location (not address, just country/area/city) and if possible a few other details such as the type of soil in your garden, the type of lawn. Great photo though - very clear and helpful! If you’re able to provide additional details, please update your original question by clicking the Edit button above. – andrewbuilder Apr 3 '18 at 0:28
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It's a Sedum variety, common name Stonecrop. As to which one, it's fairly similar to Sedum album 'Coral Carpet', http://www.craigiehallnursery.co.uk/ourshop/prod_2071779-Sedum-album-Coral-Carpet.html, although the colour of yours is duller - that might be due to reduced uv levels through winter. There are many varieties which are similar, but the puzzle is why it's growing in your lawn - stonecrop varieties often have an indefinite spread, so if it had been planted in a border or bed and invaded the lawn, that would explain it.

You should be able to dig it out without too much difficulty, but it is considered an ornamental plant, useful as ground cover in sunny, dry places in the garden; it's only a weed in this case because it's growing where you don't want it to. If it's a large patch, you will need to do some lawn repair after digging it out.

  • Thank you very much- that's helpful. It's so weird- it is right in the middle of the lawn. We live in West Michigan :) It sounds like we'll be doing some lawn repair- the patch is about 20+ sq.ft. – Caitlin S Apr 3 '18 at 1:47
  • This stuff is expensive in the shops. I was looking for some as a ground cover and bee magnet but the cost was too prohibitive. – Graham Chiu Apr 3 '18 at 5:57
  • If the lawn is free draining and mown short Sedum could easily infiltrate, it's a tough plant. I note that the European S. acre is listed as invasive in some parts of Wisconsin and S. album is no weaker growing in my experience, so it may have arrived by seed. Would have said 'Coral carpet' is a bit tentative, especially given how variable Sedum can be. – George of all trades Apr 3 '18 at 7:30

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