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I've been having a venus flytrap plant (actually, 3 plants in the same pot) for about 8 months.

It was greeh and healthy, but about 4/5 months ago (summer here in Spain) it started to become black and dying. So I moved from the balcony to our living room, where it has no direct sunlight but more "regular" temperatures.

I was pretty sure it was almost dead, but to my surprise, a couple of months ago the plant started developing new leaves again (although the traps seem not to fully develop). I don't directly water it, I put water in a plastic recipient from where it can absorb the water (distilled water)

And I've recently discovered that the tall stem you can see in the picture is actually a flower bud.

So, I wonder if now that it is going (hopefully!) to blossom, it has different needs on water/light/whatever.

Any advice? Thanks!

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A general answer because nobody is answering yet.

If it is flowering, it means that you cared the plant correctly. I would keep the condition you did until now. Often flowering phase is not a high requirement phase: the plant flowers when it know that it can afford to flower (so it is sometime difficult to have flowering plants).

The difficult phase is the next one: having fruits/seeds. If you care about these, you should probably manually pollinate the flower, and possibly get fertilizers, water and sun, in order to build fruits. In this case, the fruit is small (and ovary already developed), so I would keep it as you are doing., and correct if I see that plants is "complaining".

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    Sometimes flowering can be a sign of a last attempt on survival, though. It seems that the plants is producing new leaves including new traps so I hope it is reviving now. – benn Feb 19 '18 at 20:52
  • @b.nota: also for perennials? – Giacomo Catenazzi Feb 20 '18 at 7:53
  • @b.nota: It seems natural, but I'm thinking on such plant, and I cannot remember one. Note: as I wrote, preparing buds, ovaries takes energy, but not so much on flowering, so I doesn't consider cut branches and steam flowering as last attempt (that is just driven by temperature) – Giacomo Catenazzi Feb 20 '18 at 8:01
  • I am not sure if this is really the case here. I hope the plant will revive, it is just a comment to tell that I have seen this in dying plants as well. – benn Feb 20 '18 at 8:23

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