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In the city where I live, I've seen metallic frames like this one in various places, at the base of the trees. The tree is already big, I don't think it will prevent it from growing in one direction or another.

And is there any reason for it to be inclined?

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second

third

inclined straight

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    I'm not sure its actually a tree guard - why would this tree be the only one in the street to have such a structure around it, doesn't make sense,they should all have them if that's all it is. It's possible that, because this tree was inclined, they put it there for it to 'lean' on, but does it have another purpose,this frame? Its not unlike the sort of thing one would padlock a bicycle to , but difficult to say if its tall enough for that. And its the first tree guard I've seen that's so basic, utilitarian and rather ugly - I suspect it has another purpose of some sort. – Bamboo Nov 12 '17 at 22:53
  • Meanwhile I've found another one. It's also inclined. The legs are longer on the side the tree is inclined. The size of the legs is comparable with a car wheel - some 40 cm (16 inches). – Fructibus Nov 12 '17 at 23:35
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    So they've only put them round trees that are leaning or inclined - its gotta be some sort of attempt to reduce the inclination of the tree... I'd be intrigued enough to contact whoever's in charge of street furniture and planting to find out exactly what they're for and how they work round trees which are leaning. They're not tree guards as such, for a start, they're too open, wouldn't prevent animals,kids or people from scratching or damaging the bark at the base.... – Bamboo Nov 12 '17 at 23:40
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    I'll try to find more, and when I see some workers on the street I'll ask. – Fructibus Nov 12 '17 at 23:44
  • I doubt so large trees can 'lean on' this comparably small metal objects. For example, can you lean on something that is 50 times smaller than you?? :-) – VividD Nov 12 '17 at 23:52
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The most common names for such structures are 'metal tree guard' and 'metal tree trunk guard'.

The purpose is to protect the tree from mechanical impact of other heavy moving objects, such as cars, buses, people (especially overweight), and keeping such objects away from the tree.

Some metal tree guards have an aesthetic/decorative purpose too. An example:

Black decorative tree trunk guard

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