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This thing just popped up appeared near my bush roses.

It looks like, well...

enter image description here

Credit card size shown for reference -- so it's probably 10cm long tall and 1.5 cm wide at the shaft base.

Geography = Eastern US

  • Mushroom identification from a picture is a really bad idea as you normally need to examine a larger number of features to achieve a positive ID. Accidental poisoning by relying on simple visual cues is very possible. I think that the moderators should consider disallowing mushroom identification posts due to the potential to inadvertently kill someone. – William Grobman Sep 27 '17 at 21:45
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    @WilliamGrobman - we are often asked about fungal growths, but everyone, I'm sure, knows you can never be definite enough about whether a mushroom is edible without physically being able to examine it, so the question of edibility, on this site, doesn't usually arise, its more from the point of view of how dangerous they are (or not) to be in the same room with, usually in houseplant pots, or why they're there at all. Both of which matters do fall within the remit of G & L, since they are so common. This particular one is unmistakeable... and not edible. – Bamboo Sep 27 '17 at 21:56
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It's one of the stinkhorns, and yes it does look like a phallus. Surprised you haven't mentioned the stench yet, but you may notice it shortly, especially if more arrive. Its Latin name is Mutinus elegans; they don't last long, but you may find more appearing associated with the mulch. It's not toxic, though not edible, should disappear fairly quickly, but if you don't like the look of it, or feel it may shock some people, you can snap it off at the base and dispose of it, preferably wearing gloves. More info here https://www.bbg.org/news/nastiest_mushroom_ever

  • Simply amazing!!! – stormy Sep 27 '17 at 21:00
  • Don't miss the time lapse video in that link – Lorel C. Sep 27 '17 at 21:16
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Yes, Bamboo, I agree. Here are a couple pictures of the "elegant stinkhorn", Mutinus elegans: Mutinus elegans from Wikipedia from Wikipedia, and

http://www.mushroomexpert.com/mutinus_elegans.html

from http://www.mushroomexpert.com/mutinus_elegans.html

Amazing isn't it?

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