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We realise there is a vast number of Clematis varieties and hybrids and this one might not be an easy one to identify as it was planted around 1996. We have spent ages looking on the net to no avail.

We live in New Zealand and the plant is having a second life so to speak. In its first life it was robust right from the start, so much so we often had to cut it back from clogging the roof gutters. So it grew to 3 metres easily and would be able to go higher and wider. It's second life started last year when we had no option but to transplant it, chopping it back severely to do so. Following advice gleaned from the net we got it right and it's flourishing. We were thrilled we didn't kill it. Maybe you can't kill Clematis.

The main reason for asking is we would like to know which pruning group it belongs to. It is only now after all these years we have found out about pruning groups. Obviously it has done well despite our ignorance ; but as it has done us the kindness to live, we should do our best for it.

The photo was taken in Feb 2008.

Any information that could steer us in the right direction would be appreciated.

Thank you.clematis

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The reason you can't find it is, it's not a clematis, it's Pandorea jasminoides, an evergreen, twining climber/vine native to Australia which can reach more than 15 feet in height in suitable areas. Pruning isn't essential, but to keep it in bounds, is best done after flowering. It is frost sensitive, tolerating temperatures down to 5degC, and in colder regions is usually grown in a cool greenhouse or conservatory. More information here https://www.burncoose.co.uk/site/plants.cfm?pl_id=3103&fromplants=pl_id%3D3101

  • What a hoot !! Thank you Bamboo. obviously we have always thought it to be a Clematis and until now everybody with-whom we have discussed it did not know it wasn't a clematis, including folk we assumed would have known this. I am very glad I came to this forum to ask. Thanks again. – Brie Aug 13 '17 at 13:13
  • Strange thing about the human brain - if you tell someone its a clematis, the brain clicks into that and just thinks about clematis varieties, rather than questioning whether its a clematis at all. Happens a lot, with other subject matters too...you almost have to over ride the brain functionality, the equivalent of that much worn phrase 'thinking out of the box'... fallen into that trap myself on occasion! – Bamboo Aug 13 '17 at 13:51
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    Absolutely correct. And this is particularly ironic (and galling ?) for me, as I am one who questions things and will attack or approach a proposition from all angles, do it to death ; often driving people nuts. But no, I never questioned if it might not be a Clematis. Oh dear. – Brie Aug 13 '17 at 14:04
  • Ha ha, I wouldn't worry about it, none of us is perfect...but yea, its infuriating when it happens – Bamboo Aug 13 '17 at 14:56

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