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I've got two eremophila maculata aurea and only this one has this weed like? plant growing next to it. I've hesitated from pulling it because it's growing pretty little white flowers. I'm in south Arizona zone 9a The serrated like leaves are from the emu bush,what is growing here?

  • I might be wrong but it appears there are two plants in the photo. The plant is question, I believe is Heliotropium curassavicum with the smooth bluish leaves and white flowers. I also see a darker green leaf that has a spiked edge. Can you tell if these are two separate plants? – MyNameisTK Aug 10 '17 at 15:40
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    Correct. There is two plants, one is an emu bush ( spike edges ) I planted and the other is the one I would like to identify. – user17485 Aug 10 '17 at 15:50
  • As far as weeds go it seems like a good one as long as it isn't taking over the space. – MyNameisTK Aug 10 '17 at 18:18
  • Thanks for the response. I think i'll have to transplant it as it is literally intertwined with my emu bush. Is transplanting something that can be done any time of the year? – user17485 Aug 10 '17 at 18:21
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I think it is a Heliotropium. I'm leaning towards Heliotropium curassavicum. It is a very pretty plant so maybe you can leave it or transplant it to another spot in your garden if it is causing crowding.

Heliotropium Growing Guide

  • Thanks for the response. I think i'll have to transplant it as it is literally intertwined with my emu bush. Is transplanting something that can be done any time of the year? – user17485 Aug 10 '17 at 18:22
  • Someone else here might know better but I would say wait until autumn to transplant after the flowers have dropped and when the weather in AZ is a bit cooler. I have read to transplant 6 weeks before frost to give the plant time to establish before cold weather hits. I found a heliotropium growing guide which has some advice on transplanting. I'll add it as a link above. If you want to move it right away do it in the evening so it has overnight to adjust and if possible provide temporary shade. Often transplants will wilt for a few days as new roots establish and then recover. – MyNameisTK Aug 10 '17 at 18:42

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