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As you can see, my basilikum plant is quite tall however the leaves are too small. When I bought it a month ago it had really healthy and big leaves. I have cut them to make pesto, and after that they don't grow big enough again.

  • Your basil looks as if there are multiple plants vying for the same resources. Whoever grew this was pretty loose with seed so you've got 5 or 6 or more plants in one spot. Not to worry at all right now, point is they need fertilizer. Higher nitrogen than phosphorus and potassium but a balanced fertilizer regardless. Is that soil potting soil or soil from the garden? Are there holes in the bottom of your window sill planter? Like Bamboo advised, cut that basil down by at least 1/3 in this picture. Fertilize with a balanced fertilizer, once will be enough. Water when dryish. Not everyday – stormy Jun 23 '17 at 20:45
  • This looks like Japan, am I right? – stormy Jun 23 '17 at 20:46
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It looks like its flowering, or about to - cut the plant back by half, you can use what you cut off (including any flowers) for cooking or sprinkling into salads. Give the plant a higher nitrogen than potash fertilizer to encourage more growth. Info here https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/herbs/basil/blooms-on-basil.htm

  • Just to clarify, @Bamboo, the basil gardener should cut the plant back by half, specifically to remove the flower spikes from the plant; and as the plant tries to regrow new flower spikes, those should be trimmed off as well when they arise, so as to encourage growth of the leafy parts - right? – Lorel C. Jun 23 '17 at 15:06
  • Even cutting back the apical tips of vegetative branches sends more energy into the rest of the plant. Definitely cutting off reproductive growth does the same. – stormy Jun 23 '17 at 20:40

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