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This plant was put in by a builder. It has a central group of grass-like blades. In year 2, it has sent out offsets and spread into the surrounding area. The smaller groups are connected to the central root system. What kind of plant is this?

grass plant

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    It certainly does get wet, but I don't know that I would call it boggy. Some more info, I'm in the midwestern United States, summers up to ~90 F and winters below freezing for a few weeks to a few months. – Curious Blueprints May 27 '17 at 15:19
  • You are correct, no flowers. Let me take another look at the description for Acorus again. – Curious Blueprints May 27 '17 at 15:29
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    I like @pnuts' suggestion. But, I would also research Liriope en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liriope_(plant) I happen to have the non-variegated form in my yard. (I think a bird planted it.) Also, check out Mondo Grass en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ophiopogon. Neither one is native to North America. But, I have seen that they are very popular with landscapers hired for new construction. Hope that helps. – Diane May 27 '17 at 21:36
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    Thanks to both of you. I believe it's Liriope Muscari after reading "spikes of tiny blue-violet flowers appear in late summer" I had completely forgotten, but the plant DID have some of those. – Curious Blueprints May 27 '17 at 21:40
  • Ummm, this also looks like the green Mondo Grass. Did these plants produce flowers last year? Both of these other answers are totally viable. What would be nice is to add something for scale. – stormy May 27 '17 at 22:31
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That is Liriope spicata or creeping lilyturf. It differs from the big blue lilyturf (Liriope muscari) in that is forms a smaller, less dense clump of foliage, and quickly sends out underground stolons, especially in soft soil. The flowers are similar but slightly more inconspicuous. It will eventually fill in to become a solid carpet, as pictured below.

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