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Some blossoms on my tomato plant are surviving but some are just falling off. The picture shows where the break happens.

enter image description here.

It has been windy and there are lots of bees around.

These plants are outdoors. I am in zone 9B. I may be overwatering I suspect, but from an article in "The Spruce" I may have gone overboard with the nitrogen. I used bat guano and followed the guidelines on the package. It can't be temperature. We have been steady around 72. It can't be stress. They have been growing happily in the same place for two months.

The stems are fine. There's no brown anywhere, and it's only about 10% of blooms. I have plenty of successful fruiting.

  • Is there any other evidence of something similar on the plant stems - blackened or dark brown areas? – Bamboo May 16 '17 at 21:01
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    Is this plant out of doors in the garden or is it in a greenhouse. What is your zone and what are your temperatures? This looks like too much water, too much moisture in the air. Do you have fans going 24/7? Moving that air around is a big deal in a greenhouse. You should see the leaves moving if the air is moving enough. Found a decent site but looks like pnuts has already posted it? Other sites actually advocate horrible systemic pesticides? Do not believe them!thespruce.com/tomato-blossom-drop-1402964 – stormy May 16 '17 at 22:20
  • @susan-ross I am in zone 9b and not having these issues. I was a bit concerned earlier in the month when temperatures were pretty high and flowers were falling off. That seems to be okay now so you may be running into that issue as well. – JStorage Jul 21 '17 at 21:49
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It seems that temperature may be the highest risk, see The Spruce but there are other possibilities (also listed there). Maybe you can narrow the range somewhat?

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