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I have asked this question on here before, but these brown spots are different from the ones that I have asked about in my other question. These brown spots are very dark and are scattered, and they're appearing on the newer foliages. I would put a link to the question I asked about the other brown spots but I don't know how to do it. Why is this happening? I know why it's happening from my previous question but I don't know about these brown spots; these spots are different.

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What is your watering schedule like? Have you been over-watering this plant? (I have not seen your other question).

If anything, over-watering is my first bet. If not, then look into how much sun light the plant has been getting, and whether the exposure is direct or indirect (for best results, it has to be bright, indirect light) and whether it was somehow suddenly exposed to frost.

The plant loves humidity, but is quite sensitive to over watering. It should be allowed to go dry or nearly dry between watering.

It may be pests, but if your other house plants are healthy and the plant was healthy up to this point, then I would focus on the aforementioned ideas first.

Not that you asked, but this appears to be a Fiddle Leaf Fig or a variant thereof.

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    No, thats my other plant Nov 21 '16 at 2:45
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    The other question has the title fiddle fig in it Nov 21 '16 at 2:46
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    Oh ok, thats good to know. Nov 21 '16 at 3:37
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    What is special here is that only ONE leaf has these spots. That is indicative of chemical burns...or physical harm. Another possibility is that you moved it over by those sliding glass doors (?) and this leaf was touching the glass when the sun was magnified or the glass got so cold it froze a bit of your leaf. This is a Fiddle Leaf, not a fig, fig. Great indoor plant. Yours needs more light more consistently. This next spring think about repotting with new potting soil and a clay pot 2" larger in diameter.
    – stormy
    Nov 21 '16 at 8:23
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    You are right about the possibility of course! I would explore all the options, watering, sun exposure, other damage possibilities, and finally disease. Nov 21 '16 at 9:05

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