4

I grew my Crepe Myrtle early spring and then knowing that winter was coming, I slowly put it inside to get it used to the indoor dark light and dry atmosphere. It's been two weeks now that I let it always inside and the lower leaf are starting to dry and die. I added an Humidifier yesterday hoping it could help. But for the light, I can't make any miracle as my window isn't really facing the sun anytime during the day. Just some low ambient light i'd say.

Is the lower leaf dying a normal behaviour of three during winter? Or is it slowly dying? What could I do to save it?

Side note: I live in Quebec Canada, so it's gonna be 6-7 month of cold temperature so I must keep it inside...

enter image description here

Older picture:

enter image description here

4

Those are the cotyledons, the first set of leaves and this is totally normal. Your plant looks very healthy. How big is this pot? I am having trouble with scale. This has been a bit of work for you to grow a crepe myrtle hasn't it? I'd go get a grow light of some sort for the winter. Check out the 'pot' stores the ones that sell all kinds of wonderful stuff for greenhouse and house plants. They will have the best assortment and also have staff that know a thing or two about plants. My hubby just told me that lots of people use 300 or 400 watt (spiral bulbs) or a high output T5 fluorescent bulb. Good job!

  • 1
    The pot is quite small (I added a new picture). Yeah it was such a pain to get just one seedling out and keep it alive more than a week... What scares me is that those 'cotyledons' were fine before I put the plant inside and the leaf seems to keep getting lighter. – Jaythaking Oct 4 '16 at 19:04
  • 1
    Forget it. Those leaves are unable to make food for the plant and need to go. Leaves that don't get enough light in relation to say, the top leaves, are a waste of energy and the plant will cut off supplies and abscission occurs. – stormy Oct 4 '16 at 19:35
  • 1
    But eventually, there will be no more leaf to abscission? lol I hope it will go through winter before having lost all it's leaves. I'll try to get a growing plant light bulb tonight – Jaythaking Oct 4 '16 at 19:40
  • 1
    Pruning is the art of helping abscission along, speeding up the removal of plant parts that are wasting energy, causing disease, increasing air flow, improving crop production, or not aesthetically pleasing for humans. – stormy Oct 4 '16 at 19:41
  • 1
    Isn't it a little soon to prune though, I though I should wait 2 years... What if I cut those two cotyledons? Would it help? – Jaythaking Oct 4 '16 at 19:42
3

Stormy's recommendations would work well for you. In addition, to your comment about the cotyledons getting lighter, you might be over-watering your sapling.

Also, be sure that you can confirm they have gotten lighter. These things are subjective depending on the lighting conditions you have when you look at them, and the sapling might be doing just fine.

I would wait a few days and see how things go.

  • 1
    Thank you! I'll keep you posted then. Also, how would a lack of light would manifest itself on the plant if that happens? – Jaythaking Oct 4 '16 at 19:18
  • 1
    I meant, please check if the cotyledons have actually gotten lighter, sorry. And, that if you looked at it under bright light, it might appear lighter than usual. As to whether the sapling is getting the appropriate light exposure, what is your current set up? – Srihari Yamanoor Oct 4 '16 at 19:30
  • 1
    It's hard to explain the level of light, but it look pretty much like the second picture, I just putted the plant inside near the window of the second picture. It never gets direct sunlight, and the weather is often gray these days... I read everywhere it's a plant for the outside, that got me worried too. You can see comparing the two picture that the leaf were way more dark before also – Jaythaking Oct 4 '16 at 19:35
  • 2
    The leaves are adjusting to the reduced light of the indoor environment. That bulb will help tremendously. The plant doesn't care if it is grown outdoors or indoors as long as it gets what it needs. This is a great way to learn about plants, to grow JUST ONE from seed away from its normal habitat. You could also go find a thriftstore aquarium to make a 'green house'. Find one with a screened top. Also turn the light off at night and back on in the morning at regular times. Later, you could actually make this little guy into a bonsai which is the ultimate human/plant symbiosis. – stormy Oct 4 '16 at 20:22
  • 1
    I didn't remember you already have a perfect indoor greenhouse/terrarium!! Sweet. Big enough to even put a little teensy fan for ventilation. Be careful with temperature and humidity inside, don't put in direct sunlight ( this is where we started, huh)? AND AND AND you already have a bonsai pot! Gotta go take a class!! – stormy Oct 4 '16 at 20:27

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.