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What kind of cactus is this and what's wrong with him? I got him at the farmer's market and he didn't have a tab that says what conditions or how often you should water. I spray him with water once a week but some of the leaves have wilted and turned orangish reddish. Am I watering too much or is there anything I can do to save him?

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  • Please post another photograph - this one is far too dark and its impossible to see the plant clearly – Bamboo Jul 26 '16 at 11:42
  • ok here's more of a close up – Emily M Jul 26 '16 at 16:42
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No idea on the name but i can confidently say - water once a week is a rough guide. You should use your index finger to poke into the soil and water thoroughly (let the soil soak up as much water as it can and drain off the excess) if the soil is dry. Succulents do not need constant watering.

From my devastating experience of drowning my Kalanchoe plant.

  • how often should i poke and water? – Emily M Jul 26 '16 at 21:06
  • As and when you like. I used to poke mine every 4 - 7 days. Since then, my cycle is every 7 days in my current environment. As seen in Gramma Sue's answer, Echeveria requires abundant but not very strong direct sun (youngs-garden.com/blog/echeveria-care-guide). Given how dark the 2 photos you have uploaded, I presume your plant is not receiving sufficient light? Is there a net covering the window pane outside? – Yennie Jul 29 '16 at 4:21
  • it does, i just took the picture in the evening. should i take it out of direct sunlight? It's still not looking good and 3 of his leaves have shriveled and fallen off :( – Emily M Aug 1 '16 at 18:54
  • try gradual shift to direct sunlight if it is really hot. plants don't like extreme changes in the environment :) – Yennie Aug 2 '16 at 13:01
  • you can place it under a fluorescent tube or at window where unfiltered light can pass through (i.e. without netting and glaze). remember don't over water! – Yennie Aug 2 '16 at 13:03
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Although you can't see the top of the plant very well it does look like one of the echevarias.

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