5

I found some instructions on how to create fig saplings. But I didn't pull it off. ( Only little soon to be root stubs) They all state, cut a branch with at least 2 twigs. Remove all foliage and put them in either water or growth - earth.

I cut my two attempts, around May/July.

Is there a better time? Where to put the branch after the cut? Any suggestions?

1
  • I don't know for figs particularly, but for MOST trees, waiting until fall when they have dropped leaves naturally is a better time to take hardwood cuttings and let them root over the winter. Or look into to layering, where you establish roots before you cut the link to the parent tree.
    – Ecnerwal
    Jul 25 '16 at 14:13
3

I highly recommend winter hardwood cuttings. If you girdle the branch 30 days prior to taking the cutting you will have a higher success rate, but even w no girdling and no hormone you can easily get 30%.

Best is to take them in situ where you want them to grow permanently. Loss on transplantation can be quite high unless you leave them potted up for at least a full year.

You can find more details on another answer I wrote re fig propagation, as well as a link to a website I built years ago specifically about figs.

https://gardening.stackexchange.com/a/24115/13998

5
  • Is there a way to get similar results without the girdling?
    – Git
    Jul 26 '16 at 8:14
  • Using rooting hormone when you take the cutting will give you the same results as girdling. I can look up suggested strength in dirrs manual.
    – gorav
    Jul 26 '16 at 12:03
  • can you supply a link to this manual?
    – Git
    Jul 26 '16 at 12:04
  • Of course, sorry! I can look up the info for you as I have a copy. Here is the link amazon.com/Reference-Manual-Woody-Plant-Propagation/dp/…
    – gorav
    Jul 26 '16 at 12:11
  • that would be really nice of you! But only if there are no legal issues =)
    – Git
    Jul 28 '16 at 8:45
3

Figs respond well to "Air Layering". Essentially wrapping the branch with soil while it's still attached to the tree. It will root into the soil and then can be cut off and planted.

1
  • I never knew what that was called. I had an orange tree we wrapped with some plastic tarp and a towel rag underneath to protect the plant from ants with tanglefoot on the plastic. When I forgot about it and removed it there were small roots growing into the towel.
    – jxramos
    Jul 9 '17 at 18:33

This site is temporarily in read only mode and not accepting new answers.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .