8

I'm sprouting wheat grass indoors and its growing pretty well. I've been following video's that I've seen on YouTube to sprout it.

The problem I have is that I've reached the stage that I remove the lid for the grass to start getting sunlight and I see white fuzz in/around the roots (I've been growing them on a white paper towel and on coconut coir (as an experiment).).

I know that healthy air circulation and managed humidity prevents mold but will adding in that air circulation now help kill off the mold to let the grass continue to grow?

growing on the paper towel

7

It might, it might not, but there's no point in not removing the lid and exposing it to the air - it's come this far, and it may just be fine. If its not, then you'll have to start again, there isn't anything you can do to get rid of the mould (if that's actually what it is, and not just masses of tiny root hairs) anyway.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, I am hoping its the latter as its been just a few days (2 or 3) – Kelvin Mar 8 '16 at 16:05
  • I can't actually see anything that looks like mould - I'm assuming the white at the bottom is the kitchen paper... – Bamboo Mar 8 '16 at 16:15
  • Get out a magnifying glass and look closer. Is it mold or is it the fine hair roots that develop off the initial root spike? – Fiasco Labs Mar 8 '16 at 17:47
  • I've magnified the pic times 4 -its a good pic to start with, but even so, I still can't see any mould, just looks like further root initiation – Bamboo Mar 8 '16 at 17:50
  • Looks like roots to me too. And it's nowhere else whereas mold would not be that indiscriminate. Mold tends to fluff out, whereas I think we are seeing linear roots radiating out from the main root.. – Graham Chiu Mar 9 '16 at 0:31
4

If it is mold, spraying or drenching with an hydrogen peroxide solution should kill it. Two tablespoons of 3% peroxide in a quart of water. It won't harm your sprouts.

| improve this answer | |
3

If it is really fungus that you see, and not just root hairs, it could be the symbiosis between the plant and the fungus which is called (arbuscular) mycorrhiza.

The plant gets minerals from the fungus, and gives in return sugar back. Wheat and many crops need this symbiosis, so you don't have to remove it, it is part of how wheat grows properly. The association is mutualistic, which means both benefit from the partnership.

However, the fluffy white stuff is probably root hairs, but is not very good visible on the picture.

| improve this answer | |
2

Hello I had found solution for not let wheatgrass get mold .At first put the wheat grain into water and soak them for 4 hour and prepare a soil and after put the wheat grain direct into soil and you had finished .put some out of water in the soil and you will see wheat grads will grow in between 2 to 4 days.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I use a 5 hour soak with Potassium nitrate (2g/L 20mM) which gives me better germination rates. – Wayfaring Stranger Mar 9 '19 at 16:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.