7

I have read all the questions to this point in the category. There are questions about if the asker is doing things right, but not about the how. What I'd like to know is:

  • What is the proper way to overseed your lawn?
  • How much seed should you be putting down (ie: x lbs of seed per 1000 square foot or some other measure)?
  • What time of year should we be attempting to overseed? Or is it an anytime thing?
  • How often should you attempt to overseed?
  • Should I utilize fertilizer while overseeding? If so, what mixture would be best?

Is there anything I'm not considering?

EDIT: To clarify a few needed points at J. Musser's request ...

My location is central Virginia, USA, which means it's in Zone 3 climate wise (I believe) about 300ft above sea level, but not near the coast. Summers are very warm (temps to 100+F) and humid (upwards of 100%). Winters are cold and dry. Time of year was actually in the question ... as to, what time of you should I be doing, now you could say, considering my climate. Soil conditions are rich without much clay in the top soil (lucky one around here). Soil stays moist. I do have a mole problem at the present, but plan on trying to kill all of the grubs this spring so hopefully they will move on. I don't know what else I can add.

NOTE: I realize there is more than one question here, but since they are very much related to a single thing, I've asked here as one question.

  • 1
    Almost all of your bullet points depend strongly on location and climate, time of year, local conditions (soil, light, etc), and so on. You you mind adding a few of those details to your question? – J. Musser Mar 12 '15 at 19:27
  • 1
    @J.Musser ... I added some context. Please let me know if I need to add anything else. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Mar 13 '15 at 0:42
  • The amount of seed for a new lawn would be between 1/2 and 1 ounce per square yard. High-quality ornamental turf needs a higher seeding rate than a lower quality "general purpose" lawn. The amount you need to overseed depends on how much grass is there already. The best time of year is probably in the fall, when the soil is still warm enough for quick germination but the new grass won't be killed by too much sun or too little rain. The next best time is spring - wait until the existing grass starts growing again after winter. – alephzero Apr 19 '15 at 22:02
  • @alephzero - Please put as an answer and I'll select it as such, since nobody else has stepped up to the plate. I bought 20lbs of seed, which is probably overkill, but I'll be throwing it down right after first mowing to hopefully get more seed to the ground and ready for germination. should be fun, lol. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Apr 19 '15 at 23:31
2

The amount of seed for a new lawn would be between 1/2 and 1 ounce per square yard. High-quality ornamental turf needs a higher seeding rate than a lower quality "general purpose" lawn. The amount you need to overseed depends on how much grass is there already.

The best time of year is probably in the fall, when the soil is still warm enough for quick germination but the new grass won't be killed by too much sun or too little rain. The next best time is spring - wait until the existing grass starts growing again after winter.

You might need to think about bird scaring, or other wildlife that might eat the seed before it germinates. CDs tied to a string so they move about in the wind can make good bird scarers. For small animals, you night need nets.

  • You state: "The amount you need to overseed depends on how much grass is there already." Can you expound on this? Do you mean if the grass is dense already, or if I have a lot of area with grass on it? And how should I then adjust? – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Apr 20 '15 at 11:05
  • The 1/2 to 1 ounce per square yard figure is what you need if you are starting from bare earth. If you want to thicken up the grass after killing weeds or moss, make your own judgement on how much less seed to use. Grass is like any other type of plant, if you sow the seed too thickly and everything germinates the individual seedlings will be competing with each other for space to grow roots, light, water, etc., and will grow less well than if they had the right amount of room to develop. – alephzero Apr 20 '15 at 21:33
  • Thank you! I think I have a good idea of what I should be doing now. – Pᴀᴜʟsᴛᴇʀ2 Apr 20 '15 at 22:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.