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I'm rebuilding the valve manifold of my residential irrigation system. The existing system seems to have no backflow prevention, so among other changes, I'll be swapping out the globe valves for anti-siphon valves (I'd prefer not to use a double check valve for several reasons).

With all the lateral pipes in the ground already, moving the manifold is not attractive, but raising the bottom of the anti-siphon valves 6" above the highest emitter will put them far enough above grade that even 18" tall valve boxes cannot cover them and still reach the ground.

And covering the valves seems like a good idea since the PVC pipe connecting to the valves and the valves themselves will degrade when exposed to sunlight. Painting provides UV protection, but seems more unsightly than the ugliest valve box and will not protect the wiring from curious little fingers.

Are there any good choices for covering a tall valve manifold?

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Anything from a purely functional "shed" or "doghouse" (sans dog) on up will do. You could also build up a mound of soil around them to make the required box smaller - or head off into lighthouse, windmill, detailed scale replica of the Empire State building, or wishing-well territory. Or a "Chick Sales" (sans holes) [nobody give that away in a comment please - The Specialist should be an enlightening new discovery for each new discoverer.]

Basically, any functional piece of yard-art that fills the need of providing the required space (which can be its only function, or merely one of the functions. A shed could also store tools or gardening supplies, for instance.)

You might also check if the valve boxes you speak of stack - many open-ended concrete or plastic containers for protecting things in soil do, so you might be able to stack two of them with one cover on the top.

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