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As an example of what I am asking I provided one answer:

Lettuce/spinach grow well in the empty spaces around the base of pepper plants. Pepper plants don't grow too tall and aren't particularly dense so light does pass though. In addition, the pepper roots like to go deep while lettuce/spinach typically do not (until they start to flower anyways). The height of the pepper plant also serves to shield the lettuce from heat, which is often desirable (to avoid early flowering).

Are there other combinations that make the most use of available soil and act as good 'partners'?

Are there other dynamics at play that might be useful in making the most of a raised bed?

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    I'm not sure if the answer you're seeking is any different between raised beds and a normal garden. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_companion_plants – Philip Oct 3 '14 at 16:47
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    Well raised beds have certain varying constraints that impact what can be done to a degree (depth being the most important factor off the top of my head). That is quite the comprehensive list - may have rendered this question unsuitable here. – Enigma Oct 3 '14 at 16:50
  • The substrate for the raised beds is an important part of the question - are they a bed full of good soil on hard ground, or are they on top of more soil? – Chris H Oct 8 '14 at 15:09
  • Varying. What's good/bad for each? – Enigma Oct 8 '14 at 15:15
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Lettuce/spinach grow well in the empty spaces around the base of pepper plants. Pepper plants don't grow too tall and aren't particularly dense so light does pass though. In addition, the pepper roots like to go deep while lettuce/spinach typically do not (until they start to flower anyways). The height of the pepper plant also serves to shield the lettuce from heat, which is often desirable (to avoid early flowering).

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I find that sowing radishes down the onion row when the plants are first planted work well. The two crops produce quite as much as they would on their own, and the radishes come out long before the onions need the space. I tried planting them with corn, but corn soil has too much nitrogen, and the radishes grew huge tops with almost no roundness in the roots.

I've also found that peas have big beneficial effects for spinach, because the roots of peas are very extensive compared to most vegetable roots, and when the peas are out, the roots decompose and I've noticed spinach especially thriving when planted in the area. Peas are also a legume.

  • I may add more to this when I have more time. – J. Musser Oct 3 '14 at 18:11
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Two useful links to better understand companion planting:

Make sure you avoid planting antagonistic plants together.

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